Peter pan or the boy who would not grow up 59 mouthed

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“Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up” –59– mouthed. HOOK knows the purpose of this yawning cavity, but after what he has gone through he enters it like one greeting a friend. The curtain rises to show PETER a very Napoleon on his ship. It must not rise again lest we see him on the poop in HOOK'S hat and cigars, and with a small iron claw.) ACT V: SCENE 2, THE NURSERY AND THE TREE-TOPS The old nursery appears again with everything just as it was at the beginning of the play, except that the kennel has gone and that the window is standing open. So Peter was wrong about mothers; indeed there is no subject on which he is so likely to be wrong. Mrs. Darling is asleep on a chair near the window, her eyes tired with searching the heavens. Nana is stretched out listless on the floor. She is the cynical one, and though custom has made her hang the children's night things on the fire-guard for an airing, she surveys them not hopefully but with some self-contempt. MRS. DARLING (starting up as if we had whispered to her that her brats are coming back). Wendy, John, Michael! (NANA lifts a sympathetic paw to the poor soul's lap.) I see you have put their night things out again, Nana! It touches my heart to watch you do that night after night. But they will never come back. (In trouble the difference of station can be completely ignored, and it is not strange to see these two using the same handkerchief. Enter LIZA, who in the gentleness with which the house has been run of late is perhaps a little more masterful than of yore.) LIZA (feeling herself degraded by the announcement). Nana's dinner is served. (NANA, who quite understands what are LIZA'S feelings, departs for the dining-room with our exasperating leisureliness, instead of running, as we would all do if we followed our instincts.) LIZA. To think I have a master as have changed places with his dog! MRS. DARLING (gently). Out of remorse, Liza. LIZA (surely exaggerating). I am a married woman myself. I don't think it's respectable to go to his office in a kennel, with the street boys running alongside cheering. (Even this does not rouse her mistress, which may have been the honourable intention.) There, that is the cab fetching him back! (Amid interested cheers from the street the kennel is conveyed to its old place by a cabby and friend, and MR.DARLING scrambles out of it in his office clothes.) MR. DARLING (giving her his hat loftily). If you will be so good, Liza. (The cheering is resumed.) It is very gratifying! LIZA (contemptuous). Lot of little boys. MR. DARLING (with the new sweetness of one who has sworn never to lose his temper again).
“Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up” –60– There were several adults to-day. (She goes off scornfully with the hat and the two men, but he has not a word of reproach for her.

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