The narrator dishonors the father by rejoicing the

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divorced [the father]” (Olds 1). The narrator dishonors the father by rejoicing the fact that the dad has lost his lover. The poem implies that the dad abused the family in some way, for the mother “took it and/took it in silence” (1-2). In addition, the child gains happiness after the dad was fired, for the family “grinned inside” at the father’s tragedy (5). The harsh humiliation of the father in the first five lines indicates that years of living with the father left a tremendous toll on the family, who now cheers as they abandon the dad. The child links the gestures and feelings of bitterness with the feelings of “Nixon’s helicopter [lifting] off the South Lawn for the last time” as the cheating president was removed from office (6-7). The metaphor provides the reader with a stronger visualization of the feelings expressed by the abused family. Then, the poem provides
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Corsetti 2 an insight of the father’s job and how the family was “tickled” as the dad was fired (7). The word choice shows that the father took pride in his work (possibly too much pride), which acted as the driving force behind the divorce. The poem takes an enormous shift as the speaker learns more about the divorce and its consequences, which creates a new tone and highlights who the true victims are. The speaker says the mother “had taught [the children] to take it, to hate [the father] . . . until [the children] pricked with her for [the father’s] annihilation” (15-17). The mother preached awful things about the dad, altering the child’s view of its father. “The Victims” initially criticizes the father and
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  • Fall '19
  • Grammatical tense

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