Mapping electric fields an electric field at any

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Mapping Electric Fields:
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An electric field at any point lies in the direction at which the rate of change of potential with displacement is a maximum. In any opposite direction only the component of the electric field is experienced. Especially in the direction along the equipotential line through the point this component goes to zero. Equipment: Conductive Sheet, Corkboard, Metal conductors, Power supply, connecting leads Screws, Alligator clips, voltmeter, electrodes, conducting plate, meter probe, insulating rod, rubber stopper (1 cm radius). Procedure: The insulator rod was pinned to the conducting sheet near one of the electrodes. I connected the ground terminal from the voltmeter to the center pin. The meter probe was moved around the circumference of the rod and meter readings were observed. Potential difference between points 1 cm apart at the rod were read by the volt meter. Electric field lies in the direction in which the potential difference was a maximum. This position was marked on the sheet and the insulator rod was moved to a new position. Procedure was repeated to determine the new position of the probe corresponding to maximum potential difference. This process was continued until the last data ended on either the other electrode, or on the conductor. A smooth line was drawn through the points and was represented with an electric field line for this particular region between the two electrodes. Next, the insulator rod was moved inside the floating conductor and the electric fields were examined. From the equipotential line, a line was drawn across the plane that was perpendicular to all equipotential lines it crosses. This process was continued until a detailed description was made of the electric field over the entire area.
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Results and Analysis: Results: Potential Fields Data Power supply = 10.07V Conductor = 10.46 V Ground = 000.5V Circular/Middle conductor= 5.28V
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8.44 5 V 6.67 V 5.01 5 V 3.13 3 V 1.91 8 V Field 1 Fiel d 2 Field 3 Field 4 Field 5 Ds: 1.25cm = 0.0125m Analysis: When a conductor is placed in an electric field, charge carriers from throughout the volume will flow to the surface, polarizing the material and creating a counter-field. The potential difference due to the charge distribution cancels the potential difference due to the external field. Net, actual effect: no potential difference. The electric field inside the sphere is zero (as you state), there is no force on the charge, so no work done. Therefore the potential is constant. The experimental results do agree with what is presented and perpendicular to one another. Since all the charge is distributed on the surface of the spherical shell so according to gauss law there will not be any electric flux inside the spherical shell, because the charge inclosed by the spherical shell is zero, so there will not be any electrical field present inside the spherical shell.
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