Commandments 10 Commandments 613 mitzvot traditional reckoning refers to

Commandments 10 commandments 613 mitzvot traditional

This preview shows page 4 - 7 out of 14 pages.

Commandments - 10 Commandments 613 mitzvot → traditional reckoning - refers to precepts and commandments commanded by God, with the additional connotation of one's religious duty. - It is used in rabbinical Judaism to refer to the 613 commandments given in the Torah at biblical Mount Sinaiand the seven rabbinic commandments instituted later for a total of 620. The 613 commandments are divided into two categories: 365 negative commandments and 248 positive commandments.
Image of page 4

Subscribe to view the full document.

- Positive and negative- things you can do and things you cannot do - Some cannot be done because they rely on the temple and there is no more temple – in diaspora period there are less rules needed to be followed because there were no temples Textual Religion - The Torah → narrower and broader definitions (most central of text)- it can refer to the first 5 books of the Hebrew bible or it can be used to refer to entire biblical corpus all the way to an all-encompassing which includes oral word - Rabbinical literature - Term old testament is not used because it makes it seem as though it’s the old testament that is recasted in Christian life Life and death in the Hebrew Bible Earliest views - Humans as God’s creation Death as punishment for Adam and Eve’s transgression? - found in the book of genesis - Adam and Eve are created and they can eat from all trees except for tree of knowledge – at this point they are totally moral but then the snake convinces Eve to eat the fruit and she convinces Adam and they realize they are naked and then god notices that and knows he eats the fruit and god responds - They are punished and it could be seen that before humans weren’t subject to death but because they ate the apple they now are because when god lays out punishment one part is that humans will be forced to eat and work for it and it will be terrible and then you die Parallels Mesopotamian with the idea that humans need to die and a distinction between human beings and gods and that gods live forever and humans don’t - We see here that when god is upset with humans because they ate the apple he points out humans are like gods and know the difference between good and evil and can eat from the tree of knowledge and live forever - Need to maintain the distinction of type between gods and human beings - God needs to be the only one who knows difference between good and evil and living forever- so they needed to be exiled from garden to preserve ontological distinction of god Then the Lord God said, “See, the man has become like one of us, knowing good and evil; and now, he might reach out his hand and take also from the tree of life, and eat, and live forever”— therefore the Lord God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from which he was taken. He drove out the man; and at the east of the garden of Eden he placed the cherubim, and a sword flaming and turning to guard the way to the tree of life. (Genesis 3:22-24)
Image of page 5
Animating principle gods breath - God breathes his life into the entity and it becomes living -
Image of page 6

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 7
  • Winter '17
  • Angela Sumegi
  • Judaism

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes