These types of oleds are called foleds flexible oleds

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These types of OLEDs are called FOLEDs (flexible OLEDs). Projector Projectors use a powerful light source (either an LED or laser diode) and a lens to project visual content onto a surface, which is typically a specialized screen. Visual output is achieved by controlling the flow of light. LCD projectors use a small, internal LCD screen to control light and create images. LCD projectors are inexpensive and can be very compact; some can fit inside a pocket. o At larger projection sizes, LCD projectors suffer from what's called the "screen door" effect. This is when each RGB pixel of the display can be easily seen. o LCD projectors also suffer from motion blur due to the way liquid crystal technology functions. DLP projectors use a spinning color wheel to create RGB color and a DMD (digital micromirror device) to control light. The DMD is a small chip that contains millions of tiny mirrors that can redirect light extremely fast. DLP projectors are capable of very high-resolution output at even large projection sizes. o DLP projectors are much more expensive than LCD projectors. o DLP projectors are not as compact as LCD projectors and also use more energy and generate more heat. Projectors are affected by environmental factors, such as physical obstructions, ambient light, and the surface being projected onto. As such, projectors are only practical in controlled environments (i.e., indoors). Display devices that use glass panels (e.g., plasma displays, OLED displays, and some LCDs) can suffer from a problem known as glare, where the shiny screen reflects light and reduces visibility. This is mostly a problem for mobile devices that are used outdoors (i.e., laptops, tablets, and smartphones). To reduce this effect, anti-glare filters—which are made of a special, non-reflective surface—can be placed over the screen of these devices. Display Specifications 0:00-0:44 Several specifications are used to identify different aspects of a computer display device, a monitor if you will. In this lesson we're going to look at the various specifications, talk about what they identify and then discuss how you can use them to select the appropriate monitor or a given application. Now, before we begin I wanna point out that these specifications are technology agnostic, that means it doesn't matter whether we're talking about a LCD monitor, an LED monitor, a plasma monitor or OLED monitor. The specifications mean the same thing. So with that in mind, let's take a look at the first specification. The first one we're going to look at is display resolution. Display Resolution 0:45-3:07 Now display resolution is a value that indicates the number of pixels that are displayed by the monitor. This value is typically referred to in a width by height format. For example a resolution of 1920 by 1080 means that the display has 1920 horizontal pixels and 1080 vertical pixels.
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Now there are two important things to remember when we're talking about display resolution. The first is what actually constitutes a pixel on the display. Now if you were to look really closely at the screen of any display device, you'll notice that it's actually made up of tiny dots of red, green
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