Research report - National Child Labour Action Programme for South Africa (1).doc

Research commissioned by the gauteng department of

Info icon This preview shows pages 63–65. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
offer and very limited bargaining power. Research commissioned by the Gauteng Department of Education suggests that out-of-school children generally come from even poorer households than those with an average level of income. Once a child has dropped out of school, whether for work, pregnancy, imprisonment or other reasons, it is often very difficult for them to return. Work can also be done at school. The SAYP found that one in every ten children (1,4 million) between the ages of 5 and 17 years engaged in school-related work activities for five hours or more
Image of page 63

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
per week. This work was not directly related to study and included cleaning and maintenance of school buildings, facilities and surroundings. About one in fifty (263 000) reported at least twelve hours of school-related work activities per week. Girls are somewhat more likely than boys to be involved in this work. School maintenance work was seen as an area for priority action in two of the nine provincial workshops. Reasonable levels of school-related work, subject to clear limitations, are unlikely to harm children’s education and may even enhance it. However, where these activities are excessive or involve potentially dangerous activities, intervention is required. One important cause of this type of work is the lack of support staff in historically African schools, particularly in ex-homeland areas. In the segregated systems established under apartheid white and, to a lesser degree, Coloured and Indian schools had cleaners, security personnel and secretarial staff. In contrast, African schools, particularly in the homeland areas, had virtually none. Thus 96% of children who work five hours or more a week in school-related work are African, and two thirds live in ex- homeland areas. The ongoing government process of ensuring that staff is spread equitably between schools has not yet significantly affected support staff. A second factor influencing the extent of school-based work is the services available to the school. The Norms and Standards for School Funding introduced in 1998 for public schools could have an impact in terms of facilities at schools, and so, indirectly, on the need for children to do school- related work. The Norms and Standards provide for funding for three categories of expenditure – maintenance of school buildings, municipal services and utilities, and learner support materials. The provincial formulae for measuring the physical condition of the school include an element on access to basic services such as water and electricity. This could result in increased assistance – and thus less need for school-related work – for poorly serviced schools in the medium- to longer-term. The Department of Education’s recently published Plan of Action: Improving access to free and quality basic education for all should help to address some of the factors which encourage child work and labour. The Plan focuses on the 40% of poorest schools, and hopes to ensure that no child is prevented by school fees, distance, or other barriers from attending school. The School Funding
Image of page 64
Image of page 65
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern