C Analysis of the Life Review Interview Compare and contrast the elements of a

C analysis of the life review interview compare and

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C. Analysis of the Life Review Interview Compare and contrast the elements of a Life Review with those of ordinary remembering. Give two supporting examples from your interview. How are they similar, and how are they dif-ferent?©2009 UTA School of Nursing5
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N3325 Holistic Care of Older AdultsDescribe 4 goals and benefits of life review. Give references and citations to support them.Based on your interview, describe the degree on a scale of 0 to 10 of Erikson’s ego integrity reached by the elder. Give a rationale for your assessment that includes at least one example from the interview. Include the reference(s) for your supporting citations (APA style).Organize your analysis so that it is completeand concise. Your total paper (beginning with Page 4 of this document) should be 6 pages maximum in length, not counting your page of references. Life Review and ordinary remembering are similar in certain ways but also differ. When a person exhibits “remembering” it is usually unplanned and informal and the trigger for the memory can present itself in the form of a picture, sound, sight, smell, etc (Latha, Bhandary, Tejaswini, & Sahana 2014). Life Review is more of a formal process where the individual “re-views the past in order to understand the present” (Butler, n.d). In the Life Review, “revived experiences and conflicts are surveyed and reintegrated” (Butler, 1963, p. 266). Throughout theinterview, B.C. would have “aha” moments where she’d say something reminded her of a par-ticular time. At other times throughout the interview, B.C. would sit still and quiet in a contem-plative manner as if she was sort of analyzing the way she felt about herself and the details thatmake up her life. There are many benefits of the Life Review. Some of the goals of Life Review are to as-sist individuals to reach resolution to past conflicts and issues, make amends with friends or family members, become a daily part of the older adult’s life, and get to a place where the past is not a hindrance on the present so the individual can experience happiness and fulfillment (Butler, n.d). When a person holds on to past mistakes or bad relationships, the capacity to en-joy the present is decreased. Emotional energy is drained when time is spent thinking about un-resolved conflicts. Based on a 0-10 scale of Erickson’s developmental stages, B.C has reached a 9 out of 10 in the Integrity vs Despair stage. B.C states she can look back on her life with much fondness ©2009 UTA School of Nursing6
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N3325 Holistic Care of Older Adultsand is very pleased with where she stands today. Even though she lost her husband and has re-mained a widow for almost 30 years, she has made it a goal to always “find joy in the journey.”She does not claim to have lived a perfect life, but she does feel that she has reached a sense of contentment and wisdom as Erickson defines as “…informed and detached concern with life it-self even in the face of death itself” (Cherry, 2018).
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