These lines are spoken by the urn to the speaker and

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and all ye need to know’” (53-54). These lines are spoken by the urn to the speaker, and states that beauty and truth are one in the same. Here, “truth” is a synonym for reality, since the truth ofreality is the only fact of life the speaker is aware of the urn is not. Helen Vendler notes, “Keats’smind here encompasses past, present, and future; youth, woe, age, the wasting of time, and the coming of another generation… Keats’s mind judges and places the single experience of seeing the urn in the total human experience of the life and death of generations” (Vendler 134-135). The speaker is able to see at the end of the poem that the urn lacks reality because he alone has a concept of time. Living a life in perpetual happiness in a single moment, as the urn proposes, is impractical because time will always be a part of human nature. Real life has change, beauty and misery, and those are needed in order for happiness to be worthwhile. Instead of living in the pastor the future, it is important to live in the present, seeing the beauty in all the sadness and happiness that comes our way. “Ode to a Grecian Urn” reminds those who read it that though lifeis short, a brief existence with true happiness and change is better than a stagnant, false reality where beauty is without meaning.John Keats's poem "Ode to a Nightingale" illustrates to its readers that though some earthly things may appear to be immortal, that everything has a finite existence and happiness can only be realized when the beauty of mortality is realized. Many topics are covered in this poem such as the suffering of the speaker, suffering of the entire world, and the nightingale’s seemingly immortal song. The poem opens right away with an odd addition to the type of sadness described in “Ode to Melancholy.” The speaker says, “My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains / My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk, / Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains / One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk:” (1-4). In “Ode to Melancholy,” the speaker warns against one turning to poison or forgetfulness when facing melancholy. In “Ode to
Alexander 8A Nightingale,” however, feelings of drunkenness and forgetfulness are seen as resultsof melancholy, instead of ways one can wrongfully try to escape their pain. Mentions of Lethe and poisons seem to imply the speaker feels as though they are dying, which can be seen through the speaker’s references to the underworld and hemlock, a plant used in ancient executions (Allen). Because the speaker is in such extreme pain, it seems surprising the next lines are, “'Tis not through envy of thy happy lot, / But being too happy in thine happiness” (5-6) which is said to the nightingale of which the poem’s title refers. The speaker is not envious of the bird, but rather happy for its own joy even when they themselves are depressed and possibly dying. Mayhead describes the speaker’s depression as, “…an excess of happiness, brought about by entering what he imagines to be the

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