Trophic levels be able to explain why less biomass

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 8 pages.

trophic levels - Be able to explain why less biomass can be supported at higher trophic levels - Be able to explain how climate change will affect the total amount of biomass in the Arctic Ocean and why From Lecture 14 Implications of summer sea-ice free Arctic - Be able to explain how we investigate how sea ice has changed in the past before 1950 - Be able to fully describe and explain the different ways we monitor sea ice extent and volume today - Be able to describe/identify trends in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice and what climate models predict about summer Arctic sea ice extent over the next 100 years - Be able to use a foodweb to explain how the loss of sea ice will affect polar ecosystems - Be able to explain and give specific examples of why certain animals are more vulnerable than others to the loss of Arctic sea ice - Be able to describe both the advantages and disadvantages of Arctic Ocean sea-ice loss for humans
From Lecture 15 - Formation of glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets - Be able to describe what land ice is and have a rough idea of where it is found - Be able to explain why land ice is important to climate and society - Be able to describe and explain the steps of how a glacier/ice sheet if formed - Be able to classify a glacier (based on temperature or shape) from a description or photo/diagram - Be able to explain how snow accumulates and what factors affect accumulation - Be able to explain the different types of ablation, where they occur, and what factors affect each From Lecture 16 and beginning of Lecture 17 Glacier Mass Balance - Be able to explain what the equilibrium line is - Be able to draw/identify the zone of accumulation, zone of ablation and equilibrium line from photos, diagrams, or graphs - Be able to predict how the amount of accumulation vs ablation will affect the mass of the glacier and so whether it will advance or retreat - Be able to draw/interpret graphs showing total accumulation, total ablation, and the resulting mass of ice over time for different areas of a glacier - Be able to explain how glacier mass balance is measured in the field and the challenges of doing this - Be able to describe/explain how glacier mass balance is measured remotely and the challenges of using each method - Be able to describe/explain how and why we use the terminus position of glaciers instead to estimate glacier mass changes - Be able to explain/predict how glaciers in different areas respond to climate change due to increased temperatures, more precipitation, feedback mechanisms From Lecture 17 - Glacier dynamics - Be able to explain how the driving stress is derived and predict how changes to the glacier will affect driving stress - For each type of glacier movement (basal sliding or internal deformation/creep) be able to describe/explain/draw diagrams to show: o How it works o What type of glacier it will occur in and why o The factors that affect how fast the movement will be in each case From Lecture 18 - Glacier Dynamics - Be able to draw/explain/identify on diagrams: o

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture