That shouldnt make anyone wonder whether reducing air pollution is worth

That shouldnt make anyone wonder whether reducing air

This preview shows page 307 - 309 out of 323 pages.

That shouldn’t make anyone wonder whether reducing air pollution is worth it—globally, it ranks as a bigger killer than malaria or HIV/AIDS. But as we do take steps to clear the air, we need to be aware that the side effects are likely to be significant. Air pollution hurts India’s economy and kills 3 million people globally- decreasing it could actually solve global warming Harvey 16 [Chelsea Harvey, The Washington Post, May 11, 2016, "Air pollution in India is so bad that it kills half a million people every year", - environment/wp/2016/05/11/air-pollution-in-india-is-so-bad-that-it-kills-half-a-million-people- every-year/ ] JMov A new paper has added to the growing body of research indicating that India’s air pollution has become a matter of life and death. The study , published this week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, suggests that outdoor air pollution in the country is contributing to more than half a million premature deaths each year at the cost of hundreds of billions of dollars. The deadly power of air pollution is no new finding. Numerous studies have concluded that both outdoor and indoor pollution
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can cause a variety of serious diseases, including ischemic heart disease, chronic pulmonary obstructive disease, increased risk of stroke and even lung cancer. One study published last year in Nature, for instance, estimated that a type of pollution known as “fine particulate matter” — tiny toxic particles that can be released by a variety of sources, including the burning of fossil fuels or organic matter — is responsible for about 3 million deaths worldwide each year. In certain parts of the world, particularly India and China , air pollution is an ever-growing public health concern. This may be especially true for India, which reportedly surpassed China earlier this year in the overall amount of fine particulate matter pollution its citizens are exposed to. That report , which was published in February by Greenpeace, found that fine particulate matter levels in New Delhi came to about 128 micrograms per cubic meter, in comparison to Beijing’s 81 and Washington D.C.’s 12. In contrast, the World Health Organization recommends that nations shoot for an annual average of 10 micrograms per cubic meter. The authors of this week’s paper have pointed out that most studies that model pollution-related mortality have focused on Europe and the United States, with comparatively few studies on mostly urban areas in India. A few broad studies have attempted to produce estimates for the globe as a whole, including regional estimates for India or South Asia — these included two independent 2015 studies and a 2014 World Health Organization report , all of which suggested that pollution-related premature deaths were above 0.5 or 0.6 million annually.
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