Prosopagnosia inability to recognize faces c faces

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Prosopagnosia: inability to recognize faces. C. Faces: Prosopagnosia (face blindness) Inability to identify or recognize faces, but no deficit in object recognition Can occur as result of bilateral temporal lobe damage but also congenital Can recognize people based on other traits such as voice, gait or other body features Can often see emotions from facial expressions Social consequences "I just see the general shape," she said, "and I see the hair." … When Kari meets somebody, she notes their location. If she's at school, for example, it's probably a classmate. Then she looks for other clues: hairstyle, mannerisms, body structure, whether the person wears glasses or jewellery. She'll listen carefully to voices and note how people move. In the winter, she'll memorize people's coats. cialScienceandHealth/home
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4/29/2013 9 C. Faces: FFA in Congenital Prosopagnosics Avidan, Hasson, Malach and Behrmann (2005) C. Faces: Summary Faces are special because they are the most important stimulus for us to be able to recognize (arguably). We also perceive them differently when they are in their normal upright orientation compared to upside down; this is different from other objects. We appear to have cells that respond specifically to specific people like a “grandmother” template cell. Maybe we have these for faces because they are so special. The FFA is an area that appears to selectively respond to faces. It is also related to the awareness of face stimuli. Prosopagnosia is a condition where people cannot recognize faces. These individuals can still recognize objects. This indicates that faces are processed differently than other objects (but maybe because faces are the most complex objects). People with prosopagnosia show normal activation in FFA this suggests that having a brain area that selectively processes faces cannot be the entire story of how we recognize faces.
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  • Winter '07
  • D.Whitney
  • prosopagnosia, Fusiform Gyrus

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