6 practice practice practice every time someone

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6. Practice, practice, practice. Every time someone speaks to you, practice your listening skills. Don’t wait for “important” conversations. You can’t determine which conversations are important to the other individual and which are not. Practicing effective listening skills with every conversation is critical to deepening relationships and becoming known as an empathetic listener. 7. Mirror body language. If the person with whom you are engaging in conversation is sitting back, cross-legged, with arms folded in their lap, it is important that you mirror a similar image in your own body language. This will subconsciously indicate to them that you are listening to them, and will put their mind at ease in being able to speak openly and honestly with you. 8. Ask clarifying questions. If in listening to someone speak, there are points which are not clear, ask questions. Don’t berate them, but ask questions that will show them that you are paying attention and are truly interested in the topic in which they are discussing. Overall, effective listening starts with you. To become an effective listener, open your ears, shut your mouth, and open your heart. Once you start truly listening to what people are saying vs. simply hearing them, you will likely learn a lot about yourself in the process. A Good Listener Practices LARSEN L ooks At Speaker A sks Questions When Necessary R esponds Regularly And Frequently S tays On Subject E motions Under Control N ever Interrupts
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POEM RECITATION What Is Poetry Recitation? Poetry recitation is literary work where ideas and feelings, accentuated with the use of distinctive style and rhythm is delivered through a public speaking activity with a focus on rhythm, alliteration some repetitions. Poetry as an art breaks across grammar and syntax to create something new and imaginative for the children. It provides an adventure for the mind. What are some benefits of using poetry and recitations? 1. Poetry and Rhymes Help Develop Rhythm Reading rhyming poetry out loud makes it easier for younger children to learn new vocabulary words. This is attributed to the rhythmic structure of the stanzas that help create a known context to new and unknown words. They are also introduced to words that sound alike but with different meaning. Experts in literacy and child development have discovered that “If children know eight nursery rhymes by heart by the time they’re four years old, they’re usually among the best readers by the time they’re eight.” Quote taken from Why do children love poems . Fox, Mem. (2001). Reading Magic, Why Reading Aloud to Our Children Will Change Their Lives Forever. San Diego, CA: Harcourt. 2. Poetry and Rhymes Help Develop Phonemic Awareness Children reciting rhythmic poetry learn and understand pitch, voice inflection, and volume.
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  • Summer '18
  • dalal
  • Speed reading, Scholar Base

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