Access Control When you first create a DB Instance within Amazon RDS you will

Access control when you first create a db instance

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Access Control When you first create a DB Instance within Amazon RDS, you will create a master user account, which is used only within the context of Amazon RDS to control access to your DB Instance(s). The master user account is a native database user account that allows you to log on to your DB Instance with all database privileges. You can specify the master user name and password you want associated with each DB Instance when you create the DB Instance. Once you have created your DB Instance, you can connect to the database using the master user credentials. Subsequently, you can create additional user accounts so that you can restrict who can access your DB Instance. You can control Amazon RDS DB Instance access via DB Security Groups, which are similar to Amazon EC2 Security Groups but not interchangeable. DB Security Groups act like a firewall controlling network access to your DB Instance. Database Security Groups default to a “deny all” access mode and customers must specifically authorize network ingress. There are two ways of doing this: authorizing a network IP range or authorizing an existing Amazon EC2 Security Group. DB Security Groups only allow access to the database server port (all others are blocked) and can be updated without restarting the Amazon RDS DB Instance, which allows a customer seamless control of their database access. Using AWS IAM, you can further control access to your RDS DB instances. AWS IAM enables you to control what RDS operations each individual AWS IAM user has permission to call. Network Isolation For additional network access control, you can run your DB Instances in an Amazon VPC. Amazon VPC enables you to isolate your DB Instances by specifying the IP range you wish to use, and connect to your existing IT infrastructure through industry-standard encrypted IPsec VPN. Running Amazon RDS in a VPC enables you to have a DB instance within a private subnet. You can also set up a virtual private gateway that extends your corporate network into your VPC, and allows access to the RDS DB instance in that VPC. Refer to the Amazon VPC User Guide for more details. For Multi-AZ deployments, defining a subnet for all availability zones in a region will allow Amazon RDS to create a new standby in another availability zone should the need arise. You can create DB Subnet Groups, which are collections of subnets that you may want to designate for your RDS DB Instances in a VPC. Each DB Subnet Group should have at least one subnet for every availability zone in a given region. In this case, when you create a DB Instance in a VPC, you select a DB Subnet Group; Amazon RDS then uses that DB Subnet Group and your preferred availability zone to select a subnet and an IP address within that subnet. Amazon RDS creates and associates an Elastic Network Interface to your DB Instance with that IP address.
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  • Spring '10
  • Prashard
  • ........., Amazon Web Services, AWS, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud

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