The transformation of American and Japanese societies after the war The Loss of

The transformation of american and japanese societies

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5. The transformation of American and Japanese societies after the war The Loss of Civil Liberties in Japan: Early Showa o Ienaga Ch. 6 - The War at Home: Democracy Destroyed 97-128 The Media of Propaganda during World War II: Radio, Cinema, Print o Radio: 1. Primary medium for Americans during World War II 2. Radio as a tool for government propaganda 3. The transformation of popular culture into wartime culture 4. The contextualization of radio and the development of social, political and economic criteria 5. Wartime radio propaganda and its ramifications with the beginnings of a privatized, consumer-oriented ideology o Film: 1. Political Propaganda vs. Entertainment 2. The uniqueness of propaganda through film 3. War films with consumerist designs 4. The discussion of a totalitarian ideology through propaganda films 5. The portrayal of the enemy both German and Japanese o Hollywood Censorship During World War II: 1. Film as a cultural battleground 2. Films as regulators of society 3. The influence of combat in home-front movies 4. Racism toward Asians N.B.: To demonstrate the effects of racism on propaganda, have students view U.S. films about European and Pacific theatres of WWII, comparing U.S.attitudes toward the Japanese and the German peoples. o Newsprint: 1. How is the enemy viewed? 2. The threat of the Japanese 3. Arguments for and against the war with Japan 4. The fear of the loss of the colonial and imperialist structures in Asia Select Bibliography: Censorship & Propaganda o Abe Nornes and Fukushima Yukio. The Japan/America Film Wars: World War II Propaganda and its Cultural Contexts 7
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o Hook, Glenn D.”Censorship and the Reportage of Atomic Damage and Casualties in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.” Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars . 1991 23(1): 13-25. Examines the operation of censorship on the reporting of the Asahi Shimbun of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki under Japanese military censorship, 7-14 August 1945, virtually free of censorship, 15 August-18 September, and under the US occupation authorities' Press Law, 19 September 1945-31 October 1949. Comparing reporting under these three regimes sheds light on the "evolution of the nuclear discourse in Japan and, to a lesser extent, the United States." o Gerd Horton. Radio Goes to War: The Cultural Politics of Propaganda during World War II o Matthew Bernstein. Controlling Hollywood: Censorship and Regulation in the Studio Era o Justus D. Doenecke. The Battle Against Intervention (Newsprint) o . Posters of anti-Japanese war propaganda during World War II. o Roeder, Jr., George H. The Censored War: American Visual Experience During World War Two. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1993. UNIT III: Philosophical and Ethical Justification for the Use of the Atomic Bomb and the Aftermath of World War II on Philosophical Traditions (Methodology: Discussion) Paul and Elder, How to Detect Media Bias and Propaganda in National and World News (Critical Thinking text) The Atomic Bomb o
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