The boardwalk leads to the Causeway which is a public path uneven in places

The boardwalk leads to the causeway which is a public

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is 2m in width with passing places located along its route. The boardwalk leads to the Causeway which is a public path, uneven in places with a compacted gravel/rolled stone surface. Farm vehicles also use the Causeway path. The final approach to the hide is along a public causeway of rough, rolled stone either via the boardwalk or via the road with a 1:10 slope. Visitors with limited mobility can drive to the start of the public causeway. From Causeway hide to Lower hide is 820 m; the path is surfaced with compacted mud and stone; it is narrow in places and accessible to semi-ambulant visitors. There is enough space along most routes for a wheelchair with passing bays. The lower trail has a gate at one end. The saltmarsh hide trail has a wide gate with a locked field gate to allow access for wider vehicles. There are viewpoints along each of the trails with hides on all the trails. The time between these varies from 10 to 15 minutes approx. A variety of seating is available along the trails. On the main sites there are traditional benches with arms and more rustic seating, others are perching seats on the saltmarsh trail.
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Information boards giving details of the wildlife to be found are available along the trails. These vary in size but all have large print and illustrations. All information boards can be read from a child’s eye/seated position. Staff are on hand to help with information, occasionally there are live interpretation volunteers in the hides to help with identification of the wildlife on site. A map of the trails, with accessible routes shown, is available at the reception desk or alternatively can be downloaded from Viewing facilities There are seven bird hides and an elevated “Skytower”, several open viewing places along the trails on the reserve (see map). The doors to all hides are 79cm wide, easy to open with a lever handle. There is a viewing screen 54 m from the visitor centre made from willow with various viewing heights. There is an outside “Hideout” space with moveable benches, accessible for all users with a view to the bird feeding station. This is accessed via the Sensory garden, with ramps of shallow gradients, consisting of compacted gravel/rolled stone. The “Hideout” space is wooden flooring with grip slats included. Lilian’s hide is a large family oriented hide with a mixture of seating. All of which is movable. There are benches and chairs with cushioned seats, the chairs within the large bay do not have castors. There are some lower windows that are fixed within the bay area, offering maximum viewing opportunities. There are also windows that are on a hinge to enable them to be lifted and fixed up with a catch, these can be heavy. There is a ramp up to the hide as well as steps. Larger mobility vehicles should be parked outside of the hide. The Tim Jackson and Grisedale hides have ramps with turning circles for wheelchair users and an alternative ramp, gradient 1 in 12 with double handrails either side to the viewing area.
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Grisedale hide and Tim Jackson hide, have drop forward windows. These are not heavy but may drop forward further than is anticipated. Both hides are some of the newest with
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  • Summer '14
  • Toilet, Wheelchair

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