King island biodiversity management plan 128 table 4

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King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 128
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Table 4. Population summary for Pimelea axiflora subsp. axiflora on King Island Subpopulat ion Tenure NRM region 1:25 000 mapshee t Year last (first) seen Area of occupa ncy (ha) Number of mature plants 1 Seal River Private & Crown Land * Cradle Coast Stokes 2009 (2007) 1.2 200–300 2 Mount Stanley Private Cradle Coast Grassy 1966 (1966) unknow n unknown 3 Grassy River Private Cradle Coast Grassy 2007 (1998) 1–2 100–200 4 Grassy (scheelite mine) Private Cradle Coast Grassy 2006 (2005) 0.00000 1 2 5 Lymwood Private Cradle Coast Grassy 1976 (1976) unknow n unknown 6 Yarra Creek Private Cradle Coast Grassy 1998 (1998) unknow n unknown 7 Naracoopa Private Cradle Coast Grassy 2009 (2009) 2.0 1000– 1500 8 Yates Creek State Forest & Private Cradle Coast Naracoop a 2007 (2003) 2009 (2009) 0.05 2.0 10 60 9 Fraser River Private Cradle Coast Sea Elephant 1998 (1998) unknow n unknown 1 Sea Elephant River Private Cradle Coast Sea Elephant 2007 (1998) unknow n unknown 1 Reekara Road (east of Sea Elephant Hills) Private # Cradle Coast Saltwater 2012 (2002) 0.03 >200 1 Houfes Road (west of Sea Elephant Hills) Private Cradle Coast Saltwater 2001 (1998) unknow n unknown * Recommended to become a Conservation Area under the Tasmanian Nature Conservation Act 2002 (CLAC Project Team 2005a); # Covered by a conservation covenant under the Nature Conservation Act 2002 . Threats and Management Pimelea axiflora subsp . axiflora is threatened by land clearance, browsing by stock, inappropriate fire frequencies and climate change. Land clearance: About 70% of King Island’s native vegetation has been cleared since European settlement (Barnes et al. 2002, Finzel 2004), including significant areas of the species’ preferred habitat, viz., wet eucalypt forest. Eucalyptus globulus King Island forest is now listed as a threatened vegetation community under the Tasmanian Nature Conservation Act 2002 , and as such its clearance is not permitted unless approved under exceptional circumstances. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 129
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Stock: Pimelea axiflora subsp . axiflora has been noted as being very palatable to stock — Barnes et al. (2002) suggest that areas where this species occurs should be managed as stock-free zones. All sites observed on private land have had stock-proof fencing in place, so this is considered a potential threat only. Fire: The species grows within wet eucalypt forest that requires at least 30 years between fires to maintain the defining species (Pyrke & Marsden-Smedley 2005). More frequent fires have the potential to degrade the species’ habitat. The time to attain reproductive maturity for Pimelea axiflora subsp . axiflora is unknown, but it might be expected to in the order of 5–10 years. Successive fires within such a time scale have the potential to eliminate the species. Climate change: A reduction in rainfall associated with global climate change may lead to a diminution of suitable habitat and exacerbate the risk of fire to the species.
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