Ceded 1791 claimed by sc ceded 1787 claimed by

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Ceded 1791)Claimed by S.C.Ceded 1787Claimed by VirginiaCeded 1784N O R T H W E S TT E R R I T O R YClaimed byCONN. and VA.Ceded 1784–1786Claimed byMASS. and VA.Ceded 1784–1785Claimed by VirginiaCeded 1784Claimed byCONN.Western ReserveClaimed by CONN.Ceded 1800Claimed byMASS.Ceded to N.Y.,1786Claimed by U.S.& Great BritainCumberlandGapMAP 6.3 The Confederation and Western Land Claims, 1781–1802The Confederation Congress faced the conflicting state claims to western lands on the basis of their royal charters. For example, notice the huge—and overlapping—territories claimed by New York and Virginia. Between 1781 and 1802, Congress persuaded all of the states to cede their claims, creating a “national domain” open to all citizens. In the ordinances for the domain north of the Ohio River, Congress divided the area into territories, provided for its survey, prohibited slavery, and set up democratic procedures for territories to join the Union. South of the Ohio River, Congress allowed the existing southern states to play a substantial role in the settling of the ceded lands.©APUS/AMU - Property of Bedford St Martin's - 0-312-62422-0 / 0-312-62423-9 - Copyright 2009
CHAPTER 6Making War and Republican Governments, 1776–1789 X179in Philadelphia, arguing that its notes would stabilize the inflated Continental cur-rency. Morris also created a central bureaucracy that paid army expenses, apportioned war costs among the states, and assumed responsibility for the Confederation’s debts. He hoped that the existence of a “national” debt would prompt Congress to enact an import duty to pay it off. However, Rhode Island and New York rejected Morris’s pro-posal for a tax of 5 percent on imports. His state had opposed British duties, New York’s representative declared, and it would not accept them from Congress. To raise revenue, Congress looked to the sale of western lands. In 1783, it asserted that the re-cently signed Treaty of Paris had extinguished the Indians’ land rights and made them the property of the United States.Settlers had already moved to the frontier. In 1784, the residents in what is now eastern Tennessee organized a new state, called it “Franklin,” and sought admission to the Confederation. To preserve its authority over the West, Congress refused to recog-nize Franklin and gave Virginia control over the region. Subsequently, Congress cre-ated the Southwest Territory, the future states of Alabama and Mississippi, on lands ceded by North Carolina and Georgia. Because these cessions carried the stipulation that “no regulation. . . shall tend to emancipate slaves,” the states that eventually formed in the Southwest Territory (and the entire region south of the Ohio River) al-lowed slavery.However, the Confederation Congress banned slavery north of the Ohio River.

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