This provision does not apply to any professional man mechanic missionary

This provision does not apply to any professional man

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unless permission is given by the Superintendent General. This provision does not apply to any professional man, mechanic, missionary, teacher or interpreter; o If an Indian woman marries a non-Indian man she will cease to be an Indian. (Although, she is still entitled to her share of the annuities; o No half breed shall be accounted an Indian. 1884 amendments o Power to direct Band Councils given to the Indian Agent. o Potlatch Ban 1886-87 Amendments 7
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o Compulsory school attendance for Indigenous children. o Residential Schools officially established. 1889 Amendment o Indigenous fishers are excluded from the commercial fishery. 1927 Amendment o Indigenous people prohibited from raising money or retaining a lawyer to pursue land claims. 1950 Amendment o Indigenous people granted the right to vote, and retain the status. 1985 Amendment o Bill C-31 o This was an attempt to counteract previous legislation that discriminated against Indigenous women. o Bill C-31 enables Indigenous women to be reinstated and to regain their status. They are only able to pass this along to one generation. o This has been challenged as unconstitutional under Section 15 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms by Sharon McIvor, and the Supreme Court has agreed. The Indian Act is being amended Chapter 3 – Sarah Hunt – Embodying Self-Determination: Beyond the Gender Binary “Much of what I have read has said that we do not exist, that if we do exist it is in terms which I cannot recognize, that we are no good and that what we think is not valid.” (Linda Tuwahi Smith. 1999. Decolonizing Methodologies. Pg. 35) This quote sums up the colonial experience and agenda of the erasure of Indigenous peoples from existence. The so called, Vanishing Race ideology. Why was/is it so important for the colonial system to vanish/erase/disappear Indigenous peoples. Land, resources, sovereignty, diversity 8
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Chapter 3: Indian Residential Schools " When the school is on the reserve, the child lives with its parents, who are savages, and though he may learn to read and write, his habits and training mode of thought are Indian. He is simply a savage who can read and write. It has been strongly impressed upon myself, as head of the Department, that Indian children should be withdrawn as much as possible from the parental influence, and the only way to do that would be to put them in central training industrial schools where they will acquire the habits and modes of thought of white men. " – Sir John A. Macdonald 1. History The very first boarding schools were created by the Jesuit Missionaries, and run by the Ursaline Nuns in what was known as New France in the early 1600s. This was a short live social experiment that was conducted, and it was abandoned long before the English took over in 1763. The practice of assimilation through education was revived in the 1830s by The New England Company, a British based missionary society. They opened the Mohawk Institute in Brantford, Ontario.
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