All in all Frankenstein is a conflicted character that is at times disconnected

All in all frankenstein is a conflicted character

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says to a magistrate that “I devote myself, either in my life or death, to his destruction” (217). All in all, Frankenstein is a conflicted character that is at times disconnected from society. Robert Walton: The novel of Frankenstein was formed around Walton’s sisters to his sisters. Robert Walton is an optimistic and adventurous man, seeking the North Pole. In a way, he serves as a comparison to Victor, at least in Victor’s early life. Both Robert and Victor seek knowledge to almost an extreme degree, and they both appear to be disconnected from society to a degree. In his first letter to his sister, Walton says that “I shall satiate my ardent curiosity with the sight of a part of the world never before visited, and may tread a land never before imprinted by the foot of man” (11). His statement here shows his ambition and his courage, but later, his recklessness in achieving his ambition also becomes noticeable. When thoroughly encompassed by ice, Walton still shows no desire to surrender his quest. He writes to his sister that while “There is something terribly appalling in our situation… my courage and hopes do not desert me” (230). This is a reflection of Frankenstein’s wild ambitions and his inability to realize the reality of the situation. However, Walton, unlike Frankenstein, eventually gives up his goal, and survives. Although disappointed in his failure, Walton, at the end of the day, is alive because he gave up on an ambition that would have costed him his life. This is his contrast from Frankenstein, who persevered until the end and lost his life. Overall, Walton serves as a character that can be compared to Frankenstein, who did not go quite the distance. The monster: Frankenstein’s creation, commonly known as the monster, is a conflicted creature, just like his master. After being abandoned by Frankenstein, the monster fled to the country-side. There, it was revealed that while he has an abominable exterior, the monster was born with a kind and gentle heart. He felt an attachment to the De Lacey family, but after being rejected, he became malicious. While he was observing the family, he would “steal a part of their store for my own consumption, but when I found that in doing this I inflicted pain on the cottagers, i abstained and satisfied myself with berries, nuts, and roots” (118). However, after the rejection, the monster chanced upon young William and murdered him. He said that “my heart swelled with exultation and hellish triumph,” after committing the murder, and then framed the innocent Justine Moritz. The monster started out as an unfortunate victim, but his twisted sense of revenge brought desolation to all who encountered him and eventually, himself.
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Elizabeth Lavenza: Elizabeth Lavenza serves as an archetype of the perfect wife or companion. Throughout the novel, she constantly cares for and worries about Frankenstein, and is understanding enough to give him space when he acts reclusive. She was regarded with “passionate and almost reverential attachment” by all (33). Later on in the novel, she sent a letter to Frankenstein saying that “it is your happiness I desire as well as my own when I declare to you
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