Conclusion servant leadership is a form of leadership

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ConclusionServant leadership is a form of leadership that is seen in many different cultures andreligious beliefs. Leadership styles found in the Hindu religion and Indian culture mimic those of4
Servant Leadership in Diverse Contextsservant leadership.Being a servant leader means that you put serving others first, are able toidentify and meet the needs of others, while also serving their communities as a whole. A goodservant leader must be able to see the big picture and use the strengths of their followers tosucceed as a whole. Using servant leadership leaders can “avoid clashes and promotecooperation when all the dynamics of civilization are allowed to work in unison,” (Parel, 2003).Taking into consideration a person’s knowledge, skills, cultural background, and religiousbeliefs, a servant leader would use this to find the best way to help them succeed as well as thegroup as a whole to succeed. Great servant leaders change the lives of their followers for thebetter, giving the resources and skills to succeed in their career and life. Hopefully working witha great servant leader would inspire those to do the same for others. In conclusion servantleadership is viewed differently throughout various religions and cultures, but all seem to havethe same basic idea of serving others and helping others succeed in their own ways as well as acommunity.ReferencesDierendonck, D., Van, & Patterson, K. (2010).Servant Leadership: Developments in Theoryand Research. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.5
Servant Leadership in Diverse ContextsGreenleaf, R. K., Spears, L. C., Covey, S. R., & Senge, P. M. (2002). Servant leadership: ajourney into the nature of legitimate power and greatness. New York: Paulist PressGopinath, C. (1998), “Alternative Approaches to Indigenous Management in India”,Management International Review.Mann, G. S., Numrich, P. D., & Williams, R. B. (2008).Buddhists, Hindus, and Sikhs inAmerica: a short history. New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.Michelutti, L. (2013). Sons of Krishna and sons of Bolivar: charismatic kinship and leadershipacross India and Venezuela. Focaal, (67), 19. doi:10.3167/fcl.2013.670102Parel, A. J. (2003). Gandhi on the Dynamics of Civilizations. Human Rights Review, 4(2), 11.Religions - Hinduism: At a Glance. (2009, September 29). Retrieved August 26, 2018 fromRomano, D., & Pecorino, P. (2001). Hinduism. Retrieved August 24, 2018, from`RELIGIONS/Hinduism.htmSarma, D. (2006). Hindu leaders in North America?. Teaching Theology & Religion, 9(2),115-120.Sharma, S. (2015). Why Indians work: a cultural values perspective.Indian Journal OfIndustrial Relations, (3), 425Sweetman, W. (2003). "Hinduism" and the History of "Religion": ProtestantPresuppositions in the Critique of the Concept of Hinduism.Method & Theory In TheStudy Of Religion,15(4), 329-353. doi:10.1163/1570068033226974076
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Kenneth Hein

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