Give up something of value a large denomination bill

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give up something of value (a large-denomination bill) in exchange for something they valued more (smaller-denomination bills). It is hard to see why this is not a contract. If two boys exchange marbles, their transaction is a contract, even if it is hard for outsiders to fathom why either preferred the one or the other. Consideration does not need to have a quantifiable financial value.” .................................................................................................................................................. Notes and Questions Would an African-American customer, ready to make a purchase, but accused of shoplifting and removed from the store, have a cause of action for an impairment of the right to contract?  Yes. In  Christian v. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.,  252 F.3d 862 (6th Cir. 2001), which is cited by the Barfield court, such a claim was upheld: the plaintiff “made herself available to enter into a contractual relationship .  .  . : she had selected merchandise to purchase, had the means to complete the transaction, and would, in fact, have completed her purchase had she not been asked to leave the store.” In other words, contract formation begins and its protection is triggered once a customer has made some tangible attempt to contract. A NSWER   TO  “T HE  E THICAL  D IMENSION ” Q UESTION   IN  C ASE  12.2 In most circumstances, parties are free to make whatever promises they wish, but only those promises made with consideration may be enforced as contracts. What is the purpose of this requirement?  Legal rules exist not for their own sake but to further justice and convenience in the business of life. Economic and commercial activities are encouraged by giving legal protection to such transactions—i.e., exchanges—and not to gratuitous   promises,  which  may   be  made  without   deliberation   and  may   not  be   relied   on.   Also,  a gratuitous promise may be made improvidently or its promisee may even show ingratitude. There would
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240           INSTRUCTOR’S MANUAL TO ACCOMPANY  BUSINESS LAW,  ELEVENTH EDITION not seem to be either a legal or an ethical basis for enforcing such promises. A NSWER   TO  “T HE  L EGAL  E NVIRONMENT  D IMENSION Q UESTION   IN  C ASE  12.2 The courts generally do not weigh the sufficiency of consideration according to the comparative economic value of what is exchanged. Should they? Why or why not?   The court  in the   Barfield   case noted that “the  legal sufficiency of a consideration for a promise does not depend upon the comparative economic value of the consideration and of what is promised in return, for  the parties are deemed to be the best judges of the bargains entered into  .  .  . . Where a party contracts for the performance of an act which will afford him pleasure,
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