The Captivity of Mary Rowlandson This is a captivity narrative autobiography

The captivity of mary rowlandson this is a captivity

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The Captivity of Mary Rowlandson This is a captivity narrative autobiography with a first person point of view (Rowlandson). She is telling the story as a memoir, focused on the events she has witnessed and experiences that have happened to her. The tone is full of despair but overall tone remains hopeful. The major conflict she faces is surviving her captivity and return to civilization, she realizes her dependence on both the will of God and the kindness of strangers. Motifs: Christian imagery, bible, threatening landscapes. Themes: Blurred line between civilization and savagery, life is uncertain, the fear of the New World. Symbolism: Attack on Lancaster, the indians clothing. Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God This sermon was given by Jonathan Edwards who was one of the leaders of the First Great Awakening, in which preachers attempted to gain an emotional connection with their listeners (a new idea) rather than simply trying to interpret the Bible. Edwards was a very good public speaker and people would cry at his sermons. The sermon uses many metaphors to make its points. " and if God should let you go, you would immediately sink and swiftly descend and plunge into the bottomless gulf, and your healthy constitution, and your own care and prudence, and best contrivance, and all your righteousness, would have no more influence to uphold you and keep you out of hell, than a spider's web would have to stop a falling rock" The sermon says in a nutshell that the wicked should not feel safe. God has not promised to save those who do bad things and might at any moment let them slip into hell. Edwards used the scary imagery of the sermon and angry tone (sometimes known as "fire and brimstone" preaching) because he thought that America's sense of morality was deteriorating. The First Great Awakening was a response to this. Speech to the Virginia Convention
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In this speech that he gave to the Virginia convention, Patrick Henry urges the people of the convention to fight back against the oppressive Britain that has been defecting on promises for so long. However, in his speech, Patrick Henry states that they have tried those means over and over again, and it hasn't worked. He warns the Americans that Britain is, as they are speaking, amassing an army to come and fight them into submission. He urges them to not listen to the lies and insidious platitudes coming from Britain, but to stand up and fight for their rights. He says that they must defend themselves against the tyrant Britain, as it is the only course left to free men. He ends with his famous line, "Give me liberty, or give me death," asserting his stance that he would rather die fighting for liberty than to live a slave. The Crisis, No. 1 Presented to the continental army 3 days before the battle of trenton this work was meant to boost morale. Paine uses sensory appeal to move the minds of his audience. In this work self determination is presented as a god given right which makes the British sacrilegious usurpers of god in Paine s eyes.
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