Academic learning In addition to decreasing summer loss programs offered during

Academic learning in addition to decreasing summer

This preview shows page 9 - 12 out of 18 pages.

Academic learning . In addition to decreasing “summer loss”, programs offered during school breaks (particularly during the summer break) have been proven to enhance academic achievement and support the development of math and reading skills (Frazier & Morrison, 1998). “Children learn more and learn more efficiently when they are in school”
Image of page 9
(Alexander et al., 2001, p.177). Providing services to low-income youth, as early as age 3, can serve as a preventative measure, rather than a form of remediation. These youth can learn and are capable of doing as well as their middle- and upper-class counterparts if services provided for them are equal to those offered in more affluent communities (Alexander et al., 2001). Minimizing the achievement gap by the time children enter kindergarten by providing high quality summer programs and services should be a high priority for education policymakers. Preschools can do this by providing extra resources and enrichment opportunities that are generally available to youth in more affluent communities (Alexander et al., 2001). Psychosocial learning. Programs offered during school breaks should include a strong curriculum focusing on academic subjects (especially math and reading) and addressing psychosocial needs. Skill-building in these areas is addressed through classroom activities, group work, and hands-on experimentation. Through field trips to local museums, parks, community centers, libraries, athletic fields, theaters, and many more venues, summer programs support learning that can take place outside of the classroom, in addition to offering opportunities for youth to learn from their communities and for community organizations to contribute to the learning experience (Alexander et al., 2001). Parental support. Additionally these programs consider the needs of the parents. They provide support for those struggling to raise children alone or with minimal resources by offering a safe and enriching environment for their children (Desimone et al., 2004). Parents are able to continue working to support their families without feeling burdened by the
Image of page 10
financial aspects of providing these services for their children (Heyns, 1987). Research continues to show the academic benefits of services traditionally reserved for middle-class and upper-class families, and it is important that youth from economically disadvantaged communities have equal access to these services (Alexander et al., 2001). These services can help to support the academic needs of these disadvantaged youth. and provide support and build lasting relationships with their parents (Desimone et al., 2004; Alexander et al., 2001). Risk and Prevention: Other Considerations Recent educational research and policy reform have directed attention towards the issue of preparing students to enter school (Clothier & Poppe, 2007). Kindergarten can no longer be relied upon to provide adequate academic instruction that children need. Cognitive and behavioral skills are developed at an early age, and children who enter kindergarten lacking these skills are rarely able to catch up (Clothier & Poppe, 2007; Boots, 2005). Studies have
Image of page 11
Image of page 12

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 18 pages?

  • Summer '14

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture