The togetherness of being for is always in the future and nowhere else It is no

The togetherness of being for is always in the future

This preview shows page 49 - 51 out of 150 pages.

The togetherness of being-for is always in the future, and nowhere else. It is no more once the self proclaims: `I have arrived', `I have done it', `I fulfilled my duty.' The being-for starts from the realization of the bottomlessness of the task, and ends with the declaration that the infinity has been exhausted. This is the tragedy of being-for -the reason why it cannot but be death-bound while simultaneously remaining an undying attraction. In this tragedy, there are many happy moments, but no happy end. Death is always the foreclosure of possibilities, and it comes eventually in its own time,even if not brought forward by the impatience of love. The catch is to direct the affection to staving off the end,and to do this against the affection's nature. What follows is that, if moral relationship is grounded in the being-for togetherness (as it is), then it can exist as a project, and guide the self's conduct only as long as its nature of a project (a not yet-completed project) isnot denied. Morality, like the future itself, is forever not-yet.(And this is why the ethical code, any ethical code, the more so the more perfect it is by its own standards, supports morality the way the rope supports the hanged man.) It is because of our loneliness that we crave togetherness. It is because of our loneliness that we open up to the Other and allow the Other to open up to us. It is because of our loneliness (which is only belied, not overcome, by the hubbub of the being-with) that we turn into moral selves. And it is only through allowing the togetherness its possibilities which only the future can disclose that we stand a chance of acting morally, and sometimes even of being good, in thepresent.
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AT: Berlant1.) Ignoring images of suffering degrades ethics and legitimizes the worst violence Sontag ‘3[2003, Susan, Peace Prize Recipient, Human Rights Activist And Internationally Renowned Author, Regarding the Pain of Others, p. 114-116]To designate a hell is not, of course, to tell us anything about how to extract people from that hell, how to moderate hell's flames. Still, it seems a good in itself to acknowledge, to have enlarged, one's sense of how much suffering caused by human wickedness there is in the worldwe share with others. Someone who isperennially surprised that depravity exists, who continues to feel disillusioned (even incredulous) when confronted with evidence of what humans are capable of inflictingin the way of gruesome, hands-on cruelties upon other humans, has not reached moralor psychological adulthood. No oneafter a certain age has the right tothis kind of innocence, of superficiality, to this degree of ignorance, or amnesia. Therenow exists a vast repository of images that make it harder to maintainthis kind of moral defectiveness. Letthe atrocious images haunt us. Even ifthey are only tokens, and cannot possibly encompass most of the reality to which they refer, theystill perform a vital function. Theimages say: This is what human beings are capable of doing-may volunteer to do, enthusiastically, self-righteously.
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