Most definitions of IS include the functions this system carries out as part of

Most definitions of is include the functions this

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 14 pages.

Most definitions of IS include the functions this system carries out as part of the notion itself. Thus, for Anderson et al . 1992), an IS is a system which collects, records, stores and rearranges the data on the operations of a business, The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available at
Image of page 1
ITP 14,3 248 and then offers the results of this process to the suitable personnel of a corporation under the shape of information; this information will be used to facilitate an efficient management of the said business, to control its operations and as a basis for efficient action. In a nutshell, an IS must help corporations to make decisions. In order to carry out these functions, the system must have a number of components: information and data, people and supporting elements. By information and data we mean the output and the input of these systems. Concerning people, we shall analyze this factor later, as we deal with organizational culture. The supporting elements are the physical resources used to carry out all the functions of the information system. Such resources may be informatics-based which is unavoidable nowadays), but the abstract notion of IS leads us to emphasize that computers are just another support element, for which there are other mechanical or manual alternatives telephones, filing cabinets . . . even pen and paper). On the other hand, IT is frequently used as a synonym of IS, as we mentioned above. This is due to the fact that, strictly speaking, IT concerns the technological component of an IS, as it includes hardware, databases, software networks and other resources suitable for information processing. Going back to the idea that people are one of its most important components, the notion of organizational culture as a general term describing ``how things are done in a corporation'' is linked to that of IS, as it explains how people behave in the face of IS. Thus, concerning the people who are part of an IS, the culture of an organization will influence and be influenced by both users who generate the system input and/or use the output) and technicians including the operators in charge of feeding data into the computer and/or monitoring its correct operation; system analysts, who are responsible for the logical design of such systems, and the programmers, who create the computer software). If they are members of the corporation or are directly related to it, they are part of the organizational culture or according to El Sawy 1985) ``cultural implicates''. In this way, none of these must be excluded from an analysis of the organizational behaviour in the face of IT. Besides, Pliskin et al . 1993) point out that the same IS may have different meanings for different people, such as system analysts and users, for their points of view concerning these systems may not be the same. Unfortunately, in many cases IS is implemented following technicians' analyses and considerations, with little if any regard for end users. In addition
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 14 pages?

  • Fall '17

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes