The client has had the need to be accepted and the therapist within the

The client has had the need to be accepted and the

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The client has had the need to be accepted, and the therapist within the encounter has fulfilled the client’s need by totally accepting what the words of the client (Lee, 2011). Evolution After Rogers’s departure from academia practitioners of person-centered therapy began refitting the theory. (Quinn, 2015). Cooper and McLeod (2010) suggested that different clients would benefit using various techniques within the therapeutic process. The use of multiple techniques in aiding a client was recommended based upon Rogers’s publications which stated, “I hope we’re always on the move to a new theory, new ways of being, to new areas of dealing with situations, new ways of being with persons” (as cited in Kirschenbaum, 2012, p. 18). While Rogers resisted organizations and defining the meaning of person-centered in life, he wanted the person-centered approach to continue developing. Rogers insisted that defining a client- centered/ person-centered approach would cause the cause stagnation which would make establishing an orthodoxy almost impossible (Kirschenbaum, 2012). Modern person-centered therapists have integrated techniques from various therapeutic theories while using Rogers’s conditions (Quinn, 2015). The person-centered approach has developed into a more pluralistic approach, what Quinn (2015) calls PCT-plus. Using a variety of methods to aid in the therapeutic process, the counselor has been more directive to achieve certain outcomes with the client (Kirschenbaum, 2012). Yet, this may lead to ineffective counseling as the therapist is motivated to be the agent of change instead of motivated by the core conditions. There is no longer unconditional
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PERSON-CENTERED AND CLASSICAL ROGERIAN 11 acceptance, so change may not occur. The theory hypothesized by Rogers was that the client understood himself and could be his own agent for change with the trust of the counselor. Using different techniques may imply that the counselor has lost trust in the client’s ability to know himself (Quinn, 2015). Laura Rice and Eugene Gendlin, both followers of Rogers, aided in the emergence of the PCT-plus movement—branches of person-centered therapy. Rice aided in mentoring the founder of emotion-focused therapy, and Gendlin developed focused- oriented (Quinn, 2015). “Pluralistic” person-centered therapists assumed that no one technique will work for all, and the facilitating conditions are not necessary and sufficient (Cooper & McLeod, 2010; & Quinn, 2015). The method of pluralistic person-centered therapy placed priority on the client’s needs and the therapist’s ability to respond to those needs with appropriate technique which may vary every meeting (Cooper & McLeod, 2010). Together the client and therapist created a plan or agenda that is suited best for the client (Cooper & McLeod, 2010; & Quinn 2015). Unlike the classical Rogerian approach, pluralistic PCA began therapy with the client’s goals as a starting point to better understand the motivation of the client’s will to change. Classical Rogerian therapists would have felt that agendas or beginning with the goal in mind was too focus- oriented and too mechanical (Cooper & McLeod, 2010).
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