Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks Anticipatory Set Activity

Instructional strategies and learning tasks

This preview shows page 2 - 5 out of 8 pages.

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks
Image of page 2
Anticipatory Set: Activity Description/Teacher Student Actions 1. Teacher will let students know that they will need a set of connecting cubes along with their worksheet, a white board and expo marker with them at their carpet spots (look at materials section). Give students some time to gather all the materials and sit on their carpet spots showing that they are all ready for the lesson to begin. 2. Point to the list of math vocabulary words on the wall (tens, ones, tens trains, two-digit number & place value mats) Go over the words and the meaning with students. With students’ help, draw out an example of each word and show students that the place value mats look like and explain to students that they will be working with these vocabulary words and the mats today. 1. When teacher says “go” grab a set of connecting cubes, white board and a dry erase marker and sit on their carpet spots ready to follow along with teacher. 2. Students repeat after teacher each vocabulary words and help teacher draw out an example that matches each vocabulary word on the board. Presentation Procedures for New Information and/or Modeling: Activity Description/Teacher Student Actions 1.(Show the number 23 on the board) ask students “How can youuse your connecting cubes to show the number 23? Can you think of more than one way?”then allow time for students to work together. Walk around and check on students prior 1.Work with a partner to make the number 23 using connecting cubes. Show work to teacher and answer teacher questions. 2.Follow along and answer teacher
Image of page 3
understanding and invite volunteers to share their work with the class. 2. Bring the class back together and ask each group to count of 23 connecting cubes. Ask “These cubes show the number 23. Can you make a ten with these cubes? [yes] Can you make two te ns? [yes] What number do two tens make? [20]” 3.Ask “You have 23 ones. Make as many ten-trains as you can. How many tens did you make?”Have students follow you as you make 2ten-trains and then write down the number 2 sticks in the tens column of your place value mats. Ask “After we made these 2 ten trains, how many ones do we have left?”[3] And write down the 3 dots in the ones column. Say“You can put the number of tens and ones together to make 23!”questions with the whole class.3.Follow along with teacher and connect the cubes together to make 2 ten trains with 3 ones left over. Write out 2 (sticks-represent tens) in the tens column and 3 (dots-represent ones) in the ones column on their place value mat. Guided Practice: Activity Description/Teacher Student Actions 1. Write out the next number (54). 2. Say “Let’s work together to find how many tens and ones are in the number 54. First, let’s build out the number 54 using connecting cubes” Have students work with a partner to build the number 54 with their connecting cubes. Walk around and double check as students are working, making sure they are grouping their ones into tens and have out 5 tens train and 4 single cubes.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 8 pages?

  • Fall '16
  • Numerical digit, WHITE BOARD

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture