4 Nonverbal distractions Some of us find it hard to listen if a speaker is

4 nonverbal distractions some of us find it hard to

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4. Nonverbal distractions: - Some of us find it hard to listen if a speaker is different from what we are expecting. For example, unusual clothing, body twitches, or radical hairstyle and colour. 5. Thought speed: - Thoughts are faster than speech, therefore sometimes our mind becomes bored and starts to wander. 6. Faking attention: - Faked attention threatens effective listening because it encourages the mind to engage in flights of unchecked fancy. Those who fake attention find it hard to concentrate. 7. Grandstanding: - We sometimes fail to listen carefully because we’re waiting politely for the next pause to that we can have our turn to speak. 8. Technological barriers: - Your ability to listen attentively is undermined by a habit of checking a device such as your cellphone. Tips for becoming an active listener (11): 1. Stop talking: - Learn to concentrate on what the speaker is saying, and not what your next comment is going to be. 2. Control your surroundings: - Remove competing sounds such as, close the door, turn off handheld devices etc.\ 3. Establish a receptive mindset: - Expect to learn something by listening. If the message is complex, think of it as a mental challenge. 4. Keep an open mind: - We all sift and filter information through our own biases and values. Hear what is really being said, not what you want to hear. 5. Listen for main points:
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- Concentration is enhanced and satisfaction is at its highest point when you look for and recognize the speaker’s central theme. 6. Capitalize on lag time: - Make use of the quickness of your mind by reviewing the speaker’s points. Don’t allow yourself to day dream. 7. Listen between lines: - Listen for feelings as well as for facts. 8. Judge ideas, not appearances: - Concentrate on the content of the message, not on its delivery. 9. Be patient: - Force yourself to listen to the speaker’s entire argument or message before reacting. 10. Take selective notes: - For some situations, thoughtful note taking may be necessary to record important facts that must be recalled later. 11. Provide feedback; - Let the speaker know that you are listening. Getting involved improves the communication process for both the speaker and the listener. Improving your nonverbal communication skills: - Nonverbal clues, speak louder than words. They include, eye contact, facial expressions, body movements etc. - Nonverbal clues affect how a message is interpreted, or decoded, by the receiver. - What is nonverbal communication? It includes all unwritten and unspoken messages whether intended or not. - Messages are even harder to decipher when the verbal and nonverbal codes do not agree. How the eyes, face, and body send silent messages (3): 1. Eye contact: - The eyes have been called the “windows of the soul.” - The eyes are the best indicator of a speaker’s true feelings.
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