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All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. EBSCO : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 5/28/2019 7:01 AM via UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE AN: 1440275 ; Couldry, Nick, Hepp, Andreas.; The Mediated Construction of Reality Account: s2775460.main.ehost
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22 role in relation to these social domains: first they stimulate the of these domains by differentiation offering a high variety of symbolic resources; second, they support the of these domains intersection by sustaining communication across them. In summary, the social world is the intersubjective sphere of the social relations that we as human beings experience. Those relations are rooted in everyday reality, a reality nowadays always interwoven with media to some degree. The social world is, in turn, differentiated into many domains of meaning, even though it is also bound together by multiple relations of interdependence and constraint. Notice that we have talked so far of a social world, not ‘society’. For sure, we cannot avoid considering how our various overlapping experiences of the social world contribute to, and are embedded within, ‘social orders’ (Wrong, 1994) of various sorts, including at the level of ‘national societies’. Those wider orders impact on our possible sense of membership of a social world often in violent ways; increasingly, through globalization, we live in a social world that is shaped by multiple, overlapping and (in their effects) contradictory social orders. But – and this is the key move of social phenomenology – those orders are not primary. A social world be built, and experienced, without can them, and so complexities and contradictions do not contradict the possibility of a social world their itself. This enables us, for example, to hold onto the fundamental notion of the social world, while avoiding any assumption of ‘methodological nationalism’ (Beck, 2006; Couldry and Hepp, 2012; Wimmer and Glick Schiller, 2002): we do not take the borders of ‘national societies’, whatever their practical importance for various purposes, as ‘natural’ limits of the social world. We also avoid assuming that any single ‘society’ (whether local, regional, national or global) is the only and exclusive ‘order’ in which the social world is embedded for particular sets of actors. Media today play a key role in the proliferating complexity of social , that is, in shaping the for ordering possibilities social order. We will come back later in to the question of social order, but on various Chapter 10 scales, not just those of the nation. With deep mediatization, it is often, as we will find, at ambiguities the level of social ordering that characterize our experience. All the more important then that we take the social world in general (not any particular social order) as the departure of our analysis.
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