The remains of fort armistead are surprisingly

This preview shows page 10 - 12 out of 30 pages.

The remains of Fort Armistead are surprisingly undisturbed.  Archaeologist Bill Jurgelski is able to use an ordinary vacuum  to remove the fine layer of dirt that covers much of the site. "The Cherokee were trying to play by American rules," says  archaeologist Lance Greene, who worked with Riggs at UNC  and now works at the Fort Armistead dig. "They were forming  their own national government. A large part of the population  had converted to Christianity. They sang Christian hymns as  they were marching. There's still an image of savage Indians  living in tepees, but maybe the Cherokee, more than anybody,  made an attempt [to acculturate]. But ultimately it failed." Despite the apparent Cherokee desire to join instead of fight,  the federal government began a military buildup in preparation  for what it assumed would become a long, bloody conflict. As  part of this militarization, they reactivated Fort Armistead in 1836 and occupied it with soldiers who  marched there from Florida. By the summer of 1838, more than 7,000 federal and state troops were stationed throughout the  Cherokee Nation -- a remarkably high concentration for  America's nascent military. "What drove their idea of a protracted conflict in North Carolina  was the unanimous opposition to the Treaty of New Echota  and strong activism to prevent its ratification, and then to have  it annulled," Riggs says. "There were rumors afoot that there  would be a guerilla war in North Carolina. The military was  poised for an eventuality that never happened." There was no  insurgency and little resistance when the military began the  roundup of the Cherokee in June and July 1838. Most of them  gathered what belongings they could and came together in  their town squares or waited for a soldier's knock on the door  (though some did seek refuge in the mountains). Coming  together as they accepted their fate became a final act of  preservation for their families, communities, and values, Riggs 
says. "They were trying to promote the cohesion of their  group," he adds. "They were making a political statement, a  moral statement. They believed very strongly in the ideals of  this country and the moral imperative to treat everybody fairly" For Cherokee living in North Carolina, Fort Armistead was the  first stop outside their home state. It held as many as 800 to  1,000 for stays of two or three nights. These included not only  the Cherokee, but also those traveling with them, including  Creek and African Americans, some of them slaves. They  continued on to a series of other outposts (there were up to 30 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture