Other Scientific principles employed by Y3T Y3T Training Guide Other Scientific

Other scientific principles employed by y3t y3t

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Other Scientific principles employed by Y3T
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Y3T Training GuideOther Scientific principles employed by Y3TTo further equip you with the right information to move forward I’m going to quickly break down some key terminology for you so that understanding Y3T becomes easier, and more importantly the application of it. I’ve seen a lot of people applying Y3T wrongly, partially because of a lack of understanding of the science therefore they don’t appreciate the importance of some of the key fundamentals. Rep tempo - this refers to the speed at which you perform one repetition and is broken down into 4 phases, eccentric phase, isometric phase, concentric phase and isometric phase. We manipulate each phase during Week 1, 2 and 3 in order to illicit a different, yet specific response. Eccentric Contraction- this refers to with the “negative” part of a rep (where you are lowering/resisting the weight), the muscle is under tension whilst lengthening. Isometric phase– the first isometric phase arrives after the eccentric phase and is the point at which you pause before moving the weight again, the muscle is under tension but the weight is not in motion.Concentric phase – this refers to the “lifting” part of the rep, which results in a concentric contraction of muscle fibres as the muscles shorten under tension.Isometric phase– the second isometric phase comes after the concentric phase where you pause with the muscle under tension, before going into the eccentric phase again.
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Y3T Training GuideTime under tension.When designing Y3T as you know it today I put a lot of thought into the rep tempos prescribed and the reasoning behind them. The ideology is to promote and sustain a constant contraction on the target muscle throughout the working set at specific phases of each rep. Combined with 3 different specific rep ranges over the 3 week training cycle this creates an environment where muscle stimulation is maximised, as you already know. Why is this important I here you ask? Well multiple scientific studies have shown that the time a muscle spends under tension is massively important to stimulating an adaptive response in muscles and you guessed it, that adaptive response is hypertrophic in nature. “Even with very low loads as long as the muscle is worked to the point of fatigue this stimulates hypertro-phy in the same manner as higher intensity (heavier) resistance training and the added bonus is that by training a little lighter this allows the muscle to be under tension for a longer period, as intensity is relat-ed to fatigue, meaning more work is demanded on the muscle, more muscle fibre recruitment and you guessed it more growth (Burd et al., 2012). The slower tempo also allows more control of the weight and lighter loading through the joint helping reduce the risk of injury whilst stimulating muscle growth.
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  • Spring '10
  • ABCD
  • Dr. Paul Rimmer

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