Gruenwald oskar renewing the liberal arts cs lewis

  • Kenyatta University
  • IT 402
  • Notes
  • pinuses
  • 16
  • 100% (1) 1 out of 1 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 11 - 13 out of 16 pages.

Gruenwald, Oskar. “Renewing the Liberal Arts: C.S. Lewis’ Essential Christianity.”Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies. 14.1/2 (2002): 1-24.Academic SearchPremier. EBSCO. NC State U Libs. 28 Jan. 2006 <>In the first sentence of his essay, Oskar Gruenwald lays out his thesis by stating,“The thesis of this essay is that liberal democracy is in crisis, since it lacks a transcendentmoral guide, and that the renewal of liberal arts education is a key to restoring the ethicalfoundations of both individual liberty and popular self-government” (1). Basically,Gruenwald argues that educators place too much value on the sciences and scientificmethod, which leads student to a lack of “understanding of what it means to be human”(4). He strongly believes C.S. Lewis’ writings to be a great tool in which to teach studentshumaneness. He states, “C.S. Lewis recalls what modern man has forgotten: theuniqueness and the challenge of being human” (4).In order to support his claim, Gruenwald summarizes Lewis’ contribution tointellectual thought about humaneness, using examples fromChristian Reflections,MereChristianity, andThe Abolition of Man. From these works, Gruenwald identifies “Lewis’essential Christian worldview” in terms of three elements: “(1) the Tao, Natural Law, orthe moral sense, (2) the ecumenical inspiration ofMere Christianity, and (3) the quest fortruth and authentic values in the real world” (6).Overall, Gruenwald makes a strong case for the inclusion of theology, and morespecifically, Christian scholarship, in liberal arts education. In closure, Lewis states, “Toprepare men and women to live in community and liberty in peace is the ultimatechallenge of a true liberal arts education. C.S. Lewis points the way, but each pilgrimmust find their own path from here to eternity” (22).This article can be helpful for an instructor teaching C.S. Lewis’MereChristianityas a model for argumentation and critical thought in that on pages 11-14
Gruenwald breaks down Lewis’ argument as a case for Moral Law. His discussion maybe useful as background information onMere Christianity. Additionally, Gruenwald’sarticle presents a good case for the relevance of using C.S. Lewis as a model text.Johnson, Andrew. “Is Christianity Rational? Revisiting Mere Christianity.”Humanist.63.6 (2003): 39-40.Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. NC State U Libs. 28 Jan.2006 <>“A half-century after the initial publication ofMere Christianity, we may ask: Is itsargument as convincing as it is popular,” asks Andrew Johnson (39). In his article, itappears that he feels the answer is no, Lewis’ argument is not very cogent. He analyzesthe writer as well as the intended and actual audiences ofMere Christianity. Additionally,he examines the fundamental arguments Lewis lays out in the text. His aim is to showthat while Lewis intended to write a rational argument, it is indeed not as rational asmany might imagine.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 16 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Fall
Professor
DR.Morara
Tags
Christianity, The Bible, Winter Exam Preparation Notes, Pope John Paul II, John Paul II, John Paul

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture