You aint tried to pacify nobody but yoself too busy

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wants any love and any sympathy in dis world. You ain't tried to pacify nobodybut yo'self. Too busy listening tuh yo' own big voice."AnalysisLike so much of Their Eyes Were Watching God, this passage reveals Hurston's talent for characterization, especially for both depicting and implying character through dialogue. Likewise, here, as so often elsewhere, Hurston effectively employs a regional and racial dialect that is both credible and convincing, and yet the dialect is never so heavy, thick, or unusual that it becomes difficult to understand (a flaw that sometimes affects the writings of other authors who emphasize "local color"). The present episode is especially significant, however, less for the way Janie talks than for the substance of what she says. This passage shows the extent to which she has now found—and is willing to use—an independent voice; she asserts her freedom to speak, a freedom intimately connected to her growing autonomy in general. Her power in the present scene is partly due, of course, to Joe's physical and psychological weakness, and as the scene develops, there is even a sense in which Janie herself can be seen as abusively retaliating against all the abuse she has suffered over the years. Yet, if there is, perhaps, a touch of cruelty in some ofthe stinging words she directs at this dying man, that cruelty is a testament to Hurston's desire to present her characters as complex, credible, and fully human. Hurston pulls no punches when describing the people in this book, even when the person she describes is a protagonist she obviously admires.Janie begins her speech by trying to exercise restraint, and the structure of the opening sentence here—with its dashes and fractured syntax—neatly conveys the hesitations and uncertainty of her mood. She is tempted to carp at Joe for refusing to see a doctor (as she had advised him to do), but she instantly stops herself, admitting that "it don't do no good bringin' dat up now." She refrains (at least at this point) from causing Joe any more pain than he is already suffering, but soon her pent-up frustration begins to boil over.It is one thing for Joe to have neglected his own health, but she now begins to berate him for having damaged the health of their marriage. She accuses him of a sort of narcissistic self-idolatry—"you was … busy worshippin' de works of yo' own hands"—phrasing that implies not only his neglect of her and of other people but also his neglect of God or at least of God's creations. And then, in an especially memorable phrase, she rebukes him for allegedly "cuffin' folks around in their minds," thereby suggesting that mental, emotional, and psychological mistreatment is at least as damaging as physical abuse. It is possible to claim, of course, that Janie herself is presently "cuffin'" Joe emotionally and that she is attacking him when he has little ability to defend himself, but her outburst—especially after her initial attempt at self-restraint—is at the very least psychologically credible and may even be morally defensible.

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