Reference Robinson K 2010 October 14 RSA ANIMATE Changing Education Paradigms

Reference robinson k 2010 october 14 rsa animate

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 8 pages.

Reference
Robinson, K. (2010, October 14). RSA ANIMATE: Changing Education Paradigms. Retrieved January 19, 2018, from NCEE. (n.d.). Top Performing Countries. Retrieved January 18, 2018, from - we-do/center-on-international-education-benchmarking/top-performing-countries/ Three main points that really stuck at to me in the presentation were academic vs non-academic people, standardization of education, and divergent thinking. In a nutshell Mr. Robinson states that in the current model of education that people that succeed in the current model of learning are considered the academic and smart people; if you fail to meet the expectations of the current model you are considered a non-academic and have failed at getting a proper education. Standardization of education has become a one size fits all model, people that have varied interests such as the arts are left behind because our education system has conformed to a specific way of learning. Divergent thinking brings the prospect of exploring the ideas and concepts without the repercussions of the current education model. Three countries with the top performing education system are Canada, Japan, and Shanghai-China. Since 2000 Canada has widely reformed the education system by adopting a common curriculum for all schools and having selective teacher education programs. After Japanese administrators saw their deficiencies in technology and finance they were determined to catch up to western powers, they reformed their education system by mimicking western ideas and fused it with Japanese ideology to create a new education system. Realizing that the cultural revolution took a toll on China's education system under Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping realized that with an uneducated workforce he could not achieve true economic success; so he set out to reform the education system by borrowing western ideology on education. The reforms that these countries have in common really stuck out, but the real similarity they have in common is the strong work ethic students bring to the table. A model for education that I think could have a positive impact on our education system; would be for students to pursue further knowledge in something that peeks their interest, and set that as a foundation to build upon. Students learning in a field that their interests them would make them enthusiastic about going to school and learning. I would keep some of the core subjects like reading and math, but I don't think we should force students learn a subject outside of the core subjects if it doesn't garner their attention. 1) To begin with, this presentation was a mind opener on how our education system is built. Thinking back to middle school and high school, I can relate to some of the points Sir Ken Robinson presented about the structure and distractions we suffer from during our time in public school. First, I have heard the idea of hard work, go to school, do well and at the end, you will get a great job. This is true to some extent however it doesn’t work for everyone even if you do all the above. An education system that was

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture