13 The park was also criticised for overestimating the daily capacity The

13 the park was also criticised for overestimating

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at a banquet, many Chinese believe their hosts are skimping on cost. 13 The park was also criticised for overestimating the daily capacity. The problem became apparent on the charity preview day on 4 September 2005, when 30,000 locals visited the park. The event turned out to be a disaster, because there were too many guests. Wait times at fast food outlets were at
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least 45 minutes, and wait times at rides went up to 2 hours. 14 There was also criticism that Hong Kong Disneyland failed to understand how guests would use the park on holidays. Around Chinese New Year in early 2006, there was a large influx of visitors and the park had to turn away numerous patrons who had valid tickets. Not surprisingly, this led to customer outrage and negative media coverage of the relatively new theme park. 15 After seven years of struggling, the Hong Kong “magic kingdom” came alive, fortunately, and made a profit for the first time. For the fiscal year ending September 2012, with overall attendance up 13 per cent to 6.7 million, the theme park earned revenue of HK$4.3 billion, up 18 per cent from a year earlier, and made a profit of HK$109 million. 16 Since then, Hong Kong Disney has become a success story. The net profit more than doubled to HK$242 million with 15 per cent growth in revenue in the next year and in 2014 it achieved a net profit of HK$332 million, with attendance hitting a record 7.5 million. 17 In June 2009, the Hong Kong Government and WD reached an agreement to expand the territories of the Hong Kong Disneyland theme park at a cost of about US$465 18 million. The two parties held talks in early 2015 on building a second theme park as part of expansion of the resort; this is expected to be completed in 2020. 19 Disney in China Disney is moving ahead with plans for China, in Shanghai. In early 2009, Disney presented to the Chinese central government a proposal that outlined the plans for a jointly owned park, hotel, and shopping development. According to the proposal, Disney will take a 43 per cent equity stake in Shanghai Disneyland Resort with 57 per cent owned by the Shanghai government, forming a joint venture company. 20 The park’s first phase will feature a theme park, an entertainment district, two themed hotels, recreational facilities, a lake, and associated parking and transportation hubs. Additional phases will see the development of two additional theme parks at the resort. The site will cover 963 acres in Pudong, Shanghai, which is approximately three times the size of the Hong Kong Disneyland Resort. From Tokyo Disneyland to Hong Kong Disneyland – a span of 20 years – Disney has finally learned the value of cultural adaptation. The executive vice president of WD Imagineering, Bob Weis, said employees made research trips all over China to look at architecture, visited Chinese schools and homes, and conducted online and in-person focus groups to test ideas.
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