Evaluate and create 5 Refer to Source 1 and conduct some further research on

Evaluate and create 5 refer to source 1 and conduct

This preview shows page 14 - 17 out of 48 pages.

Evaluate and create 5 Refer to Source   1 and conduct some further research on the Internet in order to design two separate out fi ts for: a peasant man or woman in medieval England a nobleman or noblewoman in medieval England. Sketch and colour your fi nished garments, ensuring that they follow the established rules and laws in medieval England (in terms of colours, materials and styles). Falconry involved using trained birds of prey such as eagles, falcons and hawks to catch small animals such as pigeons and hares (see Source 4). The type of hunting bird used indicated a person’s status – eagles, for example, were only owned by kings. Appearing in public with a bird of prey on a leather-strapped wrist was a sign of a person’s wealth and social status. Source 5 This painting by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, Children’s Games ( c. 1560), shows a wide range of games played by children in medieval Europe. The poor did not have many opportunities for entertainment, but during special feasts, such as at harvest time, there might be dancing, dice throwing, ball games and wrestling, for example. Many of the games played by medieval children, such as hopscotch and hide-and-seek, are still played today (see Source 5). 231 chapter 9 medieval europe 9A What was life like in medieval Europe and how was society organised?
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Squires were boys training to be knights. They acted as servants to the knight who was guiding them. At tournaments, a squire would help a knight put on his armour and mount his horse, and help if he was hurt or unhorsed. Coloured shields displaying the knights’ coats of arms were hung up. Knights could choose the person they wished to combat by hitting a shield. Special armour was used in tournaments. It was heavier and more ornate, but knights at tournaments were not expected to move around for long periods in armour. Source 1 A modern artist’s impression of a medieval tournament 9.6 Tournaments and fairs Tournaments were another form of entertainment popular across medieval Europe. The earliest tournaments took place in the 11th century. They were held in the open countryside and were very violent battles between two teams of up to 100 knights a side. Over time, tournaments developed into well-organised public events like the one shown in Source 1, where knights could show off their skills to the excited spectators. The highlights of every tournament were an organised battle and a series of jousts. In a joust, two knights each holding a lance (a long wooden pole with pointed metal tip) would ride towards each other on horseback and try to knock each other off. In addition to these events, people attending tournaments could eat, drink and be entertained by musicians and performers. 232 oxford big ideas humanities and social sciences 8 western australian curriculum
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Special lances were used that would shatter on impact to avoid injury. The knight who snapped his lance on an opponent’s shield was declared winner. In later years, a points system was developed, which took into account where a ‘hit’ landed on an opponent.
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