Edwin gordon states audiation takes place when we

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Edwin Gordon states:Audiation takes place when weassimilate and comprehend inour minds music that we havejust heard performed or haveheard performed some time in thepast. We also audiate when weassimilate and comprehend inour minds music that we may andmay not have heard but are read-ing in notation or are composingor improvising.7Richard F. Grunow, Edwin Gordon,and Christopher D. Azzara add: “Toaudiate is to ‘hear’ and to comprehendmusic for which the sound may or maynot be physically present. Audiation isto music what thought is to language.”8All of the well-known music educationmethodologies (Orff, Kodály, Suzuki,Gordon’s Music Learning Theory) sup-port the concept of “rote before note,”and yet in my experience, much musicinstruction introduces notation longbefore students are musically ready toread. Gordon discusses four “vocabu-laries” of music learning: listening,speaking, reading, and writing. Musicteachers at all levels are encouraged towork to provide solid listening vocabu-laries (through modeling and provid-ing many tunes in a variety of tonali-ties,meters,timbres,andmusicalstyles) in addition to providing oppor-tunities for students to “speak” inmusic(throughsinging,moving,chanting, playing, and improvising)before notation. Once students havethe necessary readiness for readingmusic provided by solid activities in lis-tening and speaking, notation withunderstanding can be achieved as thespirit of Standard 5.Standard 6: Listening to,Analyzing, and DescribingMusicStandard 6 represents content that Ithink most music teachers do providein music classrooms in the spirit of thestandards. Most music teachers at alllevels provide listening activities, andthey often ask students to describewhat they are hearing. What maysometimes be overlooked in this stan-dard is the recommendation that stu-dents “analyze” as well as listen anddescribe. Analysis requires audiation aswell as musical vocabulary to discussthe elements of music. The spirit ofStandard 6 cannot be met withoutsequential instruction and skills-basedlearning. Children need to be taught tohear and label the differences betweenmajor and minor tonality, duple andtriple meters, tonic and dominant har-monic functions, and so forth. Theyneed a logical rhythm syllable systemthat can be understood without nota-tion and they need instruction insolfège so they have the vocabulary tolisten, describe, and analyze. Listeninglessons that focus on hearing the ele-ments of music (melody, harmony,rhythm, texture, and form) will assistin capturing the spirit of Standard 6.W W W. M E N C . O R G37
Standard 7: Evaluating Musicand Music PerformancesIn searching for the true spirit ofStandard 7, I find more questions thananswers. Students in ensembles areoften asked to evaluate themselves ortheir ensemble in preparation for orafter a performance. Although this isone way of addressing this standard, itmay not be enough to really capturethe spirit. To teach students to “evalu-

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Term
Fall
Professor
Carteret
Tags
Music, Music Educators Journal

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