46 what were the circumstances of baby suggs marriage

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46. What were the circumstances of Baby Suggs' marriage? What have been some of the limitations of Garner's relatively lenient treatment? (146) 47. What have been some of the disappointments of her life? Is she successful in finding her children? (147) 48. What special powers is she alleged to have? 49. What had been her views on religion? (146) 50. What may be some effects of having a mother-in-law, not a mother, dominate Sethe's past? 51. From whose point of view is the murder described? (148) How does the speaker's testimony frame our view of the situation? What does he regret, and at whom is his anger directed? 52. What account is contained in the newspaper article Stamp Paid shows Paul D.? On what grounds does Paul D. reject its authenticity? 53. How do the neighbors respond when they see the posse of white men in search of Sethe? What difference does their failure to warn Sethe have? 54. What characterizes Sethe's account of her past action? What had motivated her to try to kill her children? Does she believe the results were at least in part justified? What is Paul D.'s reaction to all this? Beloved is set in 1873, on the outskirts of Cincinnati, Ohio. Sethe and her daughter Denver live alone in the house at 124. We learn right away that Sethe's two sons, Buglar and Howard, had run away years before and that Sethe's mother-in-law, Baby Suggs, is dead. Furthermore, we know that 124 is haunted.
The story begins when Paul D., a man from Sethe's past, shows up on their porch unexpectedly. The tone of the novel Beloved is dark. One example of how Morrison sets the tone occurs when she writes about Sethe's soul. She writes, "Counting on the stillness of her own soul, she had forgotten the other one: the soul of her baby girl" (Morrison, p. 5). The story that unfolds is that of a murdered child. Morrison forces the reader to come to terms with its unholy facts and non-facts. Morrison suggests through her writing that there was more than one wrong committed. Slavery was the real culprit behind a child's death. rough the different voices and memories of the book, including that of Sethe's mother, a survivor of the infamous slave-ship crossing, we experience American slavery as it was lived by those who were its objects of exchange, both at its best--which wasn't very good--and at its worst, which was as bad as can be imagined. Above all, it is seen as one of the most vicious antifamily institutions human beings have ever devised. The slaves are motherless, fatherless, deprived of their mates, their children, their kin. It is a world in which people suddenly vanish and are never seen again, not through accident or covert operation or terrorism, but as a matter of everyday legal policy. --Margaret Atwood ("Haunted by Their Nightmares," ed. Bloom) As we studied the text of Beloved and considered the characters in Morrison's work, we decided that we should explain who each character is. In addition, we decided a possible explanation of what each character might represent would be helpful for anyone seeking meaning within the text.

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