Hypothesis make a prediction about how you think the

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Hypothesis : Make a prediction about how you think the population of one species will affect the other. __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ Materials : Plastic bag with 150 small white paper squares (rabbits) and 20 large colored paper squares (lynx) Green piece of construction paper (your meadow) Procedures : 1. Acquire the materials for your group. 2. Start each round/generation by evenly distributing 3 rabbits in the meadow. This is because in an open field, rabbits will not nest side by side. In your data table you will see that the starting population for round 1 is already recorded. 3. Hold 1 lynx 6-8 inches above the center of the meadow and let go of it. Let it fall without touching it. Count how many rabbits it touches. Every rabbit it touches counts as a “catch.” 4. Any rabbits that the lynx touch are considered caught and eaten. They should be removed from the board and placed back in the bag with the other rabbit squares. If the lynx touched 3 rabbits, it survives. If it touches any less than 3, it starves, dies, and must go back in the plastic bag. Record your ending population for round 1 in the data table. 5. Now you must determine how to setup round 2 (generation 2.) First, any rabbits remaining will reproduce, so double the amount of rabbits that were left. Record this number as the starting population for generation 2. If no rabbits are left at the end of a round, always assume that 3 migrate in to start the round. Remember to space them out evenly in the meadow. 6. To determine how many lynx will start off, any lynx that survives will make it to the next generation. If they get more than 3 rabbits, they will reproduce for every 3 additional rabbits they catch. (Ex. If a lynx touches 6 rabbits, the next round will start with 2 lynx.) If no lynx survived the first round, assume one migrates in. Record this number as the starting population for generation 2 lynx. 7. Repeat previous steps, through 20 generations. Make sure each time you always drop the lynx all at once, but somewhat spread out. If two lynx touch the same rabbit, it only counts for one of the lynx. Also remember if you ever end a round with no rabbits, assume 3 migrate in, and if you ever end a round with no lynx, assume 1 migrates in.
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Ecology Unit © It’s Not Rocket Science 2016 44 Results : Data Table : Generation Starting Population Ending Population LYNX RABBITS LYNX RABBITS 1 1 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Graph : On the next page make a line graph on the graph paper provided to show the change in the lynx and rabbit populations over time. You will need to make sure to include a title, labeled X and Y-axis with units, and a color-coded key. Choose between graphing the starting populations each generation or the ending populations. Whichever you pick, make sure it is clear in your axis label!
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Ecology Unit © It’s Not Rocket Science 2016 45
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Ecology Unit © It’s Not Rocket Science 2016 46 Analysis : Write your analysis in the space below. The following topics need to be addressed: (1) Experimental set-up. Do NOT re-write the procedures, but do explain the independent variable and dependent variable.
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