The nature of the relationship between the patient and the team of health

The nature of the relationship between the patient

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The nature of the relationship between the patient and the team of health professionals is central to competency development for interprofessional collaborative practice. Without this kind of centeredness, interprofessional teamwork has little rationale. The other three core competencies, in the context of interprofessional teamwork, identify 21st-century technologies for teamwork communication and coordination (i.e., informatics), rely on the evidence base to inform teamwork processes and team-based care, and highlight the importance of continuous improvement efforts related to teamwork and team-based health care (Interprofessional Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011, p. 14).Week 3:Health Information TechnologyAs defined in McGonigle and Mastrian (2018) by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, Health information technology (HIT) is comprised of "hardware, software, integrated technologies or related licenses, intellectual property, upgrades, or packaged solutions sold as services that are designed for or support the use by healthcare entities or patients for the electronic creation, maintenance, access, or exchange of health information" (p.149). HIT has been promoted as a key element in the National Quality Strategy (NQS) to achieve three aims: better care, affordable care, and healthy populations and communities.Electronic Health RecordsTo improve the quality of care through HIT, electronic health record (EHR) system implementation has become a top priority in US hospitals and healthcare organizations, underpinned by national initiatives such as the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act and EHR incentive programs such as Meaningful Use (MU) (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 2013). Beyond the goal of stimulating the implementation of EHR systems, the MU initiative was developedas an incentive program to assure that EHRSs are used according to standards that
achieve quality, safety, and efficiency measures (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 2013). We will learn more about MU later in this lesson.Numerous terms have been used over the years to describe the concept of an EHR, leading to confusion about the definitions. EHR has been used as a generic term for all electronic healthcare records and the related systems and recently became the favored term for an individual's lifetime computerized record. In most usage, the term EHR is used to mean both the displayed or printed record and the supporting software system (EHRS). A basic definition of an EHR is a database of an individual's healthcare data during healthcare encounters. An EHRS is the database management software enabling the many functions needed to create and maintain an EHR. Another simple definition is that an EHR is comprised of any patient data stored in electronic form. Other, lengthier definitions build from this premise. Updates to the electronic record are restricted to authorized clinicians and staff. Patients may be shown data in an EHR but do not have control. The EHRS usually includes software to manage: a data repository

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