however folic acid would have to be consumed in extremely high doses for this

However folic acid would have to be consumed in

This preview shows page 12 - 13 out of 36 pages.

however, folic acid would have to be consumed in extremely high doses for this to occur there should be no concern about "overdosing" on folic acid from daily food consumption max of 400 micrograms in the form of supplements should not be exceeded vitamin B12 important for metabolism (common link of all the B vitamins), the formation of red blood cells, and maintenance of central nervous system (includes brain and spinal cord) B12 is the largest and most structurally complicated vitamin only bacteria have the enzymes required for its synthesis (neither animals, plants, or fungi can) many foods are a natural source of B12 because of bacterial symbiosis when we eat this food it remains in our system we need B12 from an outside source (animals) thus, B12 can be produced industrially only through bacterial fermentation-synthesis vitamin B12 deficiency can be cured by taking supplements or increasing the protein diet who is at risk for deficiency? vegan diet (no protein), crohn's disease, celiac disease (nutrient absorption is obstructed) poor nutrient absorption may also occur in those who use alcohol excessively, take antibiotics, use stomach-acid controlling drugs, including H-2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors, or take metformin to treat type 2 diabetes low levels of B12 causes pernicious anemia (a type of vitamin B12 deficiency caused by lack of intrinsic factor produced by the stomach) for vitamin B12 to be absorbed, there is a protein generated by the stomach that is needed called intrinsic factor common signs of B12 deficiency are weakness, tingling, numbness, smooth red tongue, palpitations, shortness of breath, depression, memory loss readily reversed by supplements and increased protein diet there are also B12 injections for special cases Lesson 2: Vitamins II VIDEO ONE - VITAMIN A •discovered by Dr. Elmer McCollum (1879-1967) - 1913 identified “Fat-soluble factor A” that was required for the health of rats – animals with butter fat and egg yolks thrived while those on lard or olive oil died - the foods that allowed the animals to thrive all contained vitamin A •vitamin A: - not a single compound, it is a mixture - all interconvertible in the body - found in animal foods, especially the liver (very rich in the retinoids) - you do not have to eat animal foods to get all the vitamin A - substance in the body called provitamin A that can be converted into Vitamin A – Beta carotene - carotenoids are big in vitamin A and they are not animal product - IU = international unit (how we measure vitamin A) - 1 IU is the biological equivalent of 0.3 micrograms of retinol or 0.6 micrograms of beta carotene - you would have to eat more carotene than vitamin A because the conversion is not so efficient - retinol = preformed vitamin A found in meat •what is it good for?
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