And the standard deviation is just the square root of

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And the Standard Deviation is just the square root of Variance, so: Standard Deviation: σ = ______________ = __________________ The Standard Deviation is useful. Now we can show which heights are within one Standard Deviation of the Mean:
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Science Research Mentoring Program STATISTICS © 2013 American Museum of Natural History. All Rights Reserved. 18 WORKSHEET: Morphometrics and Basic Statistics (continued) S T A N D A R D D E V I A T I O N & VA R I A N C E ( C O N T I N U E D ) So, using the Standard Deviation we have a “standard” way of knowing what is normal, and what is extra large or extra small. ________________________ are tall dogs. And __________________ are a bit short ... but don’t tell them! Why do you think we square the number? Activity 5: Calculate the variance ( σ 2 ) and standard deviation of the data that you have collected. Variance: σ 2 = __________ So, the Variance is ___________________. Standard Deviation: σ = ______________ = __________________
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Science Research Mentoring Program STATISTICS © 2013 American Museum of Natural History. All Rights Reserved. 19 WORKSHEET: Morphometrics and Basic Statistics (continued) E X E R C I S E I V : D E S I G N I N G G R A P H S 1. Graphs are used to help people visualize data. Sometimes it’s easier to understand something when you can see it in picture form. Different kinds of graphs are suited for different kinds of data. Let us explore designing graphs. 2. Designing a Graph: Draw a graph in your lab notebook. Assign a title to each axis that identifies what the numbers represent (length in cm, etc.). Next, label the scale lines on each axis. You may determine the scale yourself, but the scale must be linear and consistent (15, 20, 25, etc. and not 15, 16, 20, etc.). The origin or base point may be assigned a value other than zero. The number placed at the origin must be equal to or less than the smallest data value for the variable plotted on that axis. Notice that the numbers increase in value as the distance from the origin increases. Large numbers should always be further from the origin than smaller numbers. 3. Consult your data table. Width and length measurements make up a “number pair.” Move along the X-axis until you reach a number corresponding to the width of a leaf; now move up along the Y-axis until you reach the number on the Y-axis that is equal to the leaf length in that number pair. Place a “dot” at the point at which the two numbers correspond. Plot all the data in your table by repeating this procedure for each number pair. 4. Does the graph help you understand your data? Perhaps it is the wrong type of graph. How about trying a Histogram?
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Science Research Mentoring Program STATISTICS © 2013 American Museum of Natural History. All Rights Reserved. 20 Session Four: Statistical Analysis L E A R N I N G O B J E C T I V E S This activity reinforces the utility of statistics in biology. Students will use Excel to calculate average, standard deviation, regression analysis, learn how to create different types of graph, and consider what makes a good graph.
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  • Fall '17
  • Statistics, Natural history, American Museum of Natural History, American Museum, Science Research

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