To be clear our commitments are to what might be called an Indigenous futurity

To be clear our commitments are to what might be

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 4 pages.

into the multicultural settler colonial nation state is fettered to settler futurity. To be clear, our commitments are to what might be  called an Indigenous futurity, which does not foreclose the inhabitation of Indigenous land by nonindigenous peoples, but does  foreclose settler colonialism and settler epistemologies. That is to say that Indigenous futurity does not require the erasure of now- settlers in the ways that settler futurity requires of Indigenous peoples. Thwarted Interventions to the Settler Colonial Curricular  Project of Replacement We observe that, knowingly or not, there have been multiple earnest attempts by scholars in curriculum  studies to intervene upon the settler colonial curricular project of replacement. We discuss three of the major attempts– multiculturalism, critical race theory, and browning, and, in the conclusion, weigh in on another emergent attempt, rematriation. We  focus on replacement as a function of whiteness and white ideology, because the interventions have been constructed as responses to  structural racism; however, we maintain that white supremacy is supported and enacted through settler colonialism. Both of us have  been intimately involved with these interventions, particularly in browning (Gaztambide-Fern á ndez, 2006; Gaztambide-Fern á ndez &  Murad, 2011) and rematriation (Tuck, 2011). Thus, when we write about how these attempts have been thwarted, have been sidelined  and reappropriated, we don’t do so lightly, or with satisfaction. But we think it is strategically and politically important to mark and  understand how the settler colonial curricular project of replacement is relentless in its recuperation and absorption of such critiques –  effectively replacing those who offered the critiques with (now) more informed white bodies.4 Multiculturalism Multiculturalism is  perhaps the most widespread response to white supremacy in the curriculum, and it has many manifestations and critiques, including  how it operates to promote the narratives and the claims of the descendants of slaves and settlers of color at the expense of Indigenous  people.5 Christine Sleeter and Peter McLaren (1995) observe that multicultural education initially was concerned with meeting the  demands of African Americans, and then other groups of color, women, people with disabilities, and queer rights groups. The primary  demand of a multicultural curriculum is inclusion. In the US, multiculturalism grew from the Civil Rights movement, framing inequity
Image of page 1
in relation to institutionalized racism and oppression, and insisting on the strengths and contributions of communities and families. As 
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture