And brutality of war is reflected on in this image of

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and brutality of war is reflected on in this image of death. Using the word ‘cattle’ is a graphic way of showing how the men had no control over their Similerhetorical question
“Only the monstrous anger of the guns.” Owen asks a rhetorical question before providing the answer. He allows the reader to reflect on the reality of how young men die at war and what sounds after their death is not bells , but..Instead of an honourable death, with a funeral and people mourning them, they will just die on the battlefield. No one will come and no one will try and find them.personification
“Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle Can patter out their hasty orisons.”The imagery Owen uses here appeals to our hearing and sight. Owen recreates the sounds of the battlefield , showing the anger of war with constant “stuttering” of guns killing innocent lives.OnomatopoeiaAlliterationTheir ‘funeral prayers’ need to be completed quickly as there are so many to be said. This empathises the vast number of men killed in Owen uses both alliteration and onomatopoeia to further empathise the firing of the guns. The alliteration mimics the sound of the gun fire. The gun is also
No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells; Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, –There is no dignity or pleasantries in dying at war. No one mourns for our men who have been sent to be slaughtered. There are simply too many for them to be accounted for individuality and for them to all receive the burial they deserve for making the ultimate sacrifice.Despite Owen’s orthodox Christian upbringing, how his faith actually developed during the last years is far from clear, and it is hard not to think that he was not remembering in this poem those members of the clergy, and they were many, who were preaching The glorious dead will have nothing. No voices mourning them. There will however be choirs. But will these be choirs
“The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells; And bugles calling for them from sad shires.”The only choirs that will be present at these men’s funerals will be the horrific sounds of shells and warfare. Owen is emphasising the tragedy and pity of war.Raving mad- this highlights the sense that the shells and bombs are completely out of control. Perhaps there is no personificationMany men came from the English counties and countryside. Bugles were sounded, calling them and encouraging them to go to war, to their deaths. There is solemn tone here heightening the sense

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