Would Sigmund Freud characterize our sex life as heterosexual My sources say no

Would sigmund freud characterize our sex life as

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“Would Sigmund Freud characterize our sex life as heterosexual?” My sources say no. “How about the American Psychological Association?” Reply hazy, try again. Perhaps I will just alternate which box I check off on those clinic forms, a different one each time. Fortunately, I am not dismayed to discover that in the end, I cannot 198
really lay claim to the much-vaunted label of heterosexual. It bothers me much more, in fact, that I sometimes claim it, or have it claimed for me, without intending to. To lay claim to heterosexuality, it seems to me at the end of all my explorations into its history and its nature, is not so much to claim any upper hand as it is to pledge allegiance to a particular configuration of sex and power in a particular historical moment. There isn’t much in that configuration, or its heritage of classism and misogyny, that I find appealing enough to want to claim as my own. Heterosexuality seems to be bigger than we are, independent, more powerful. It is not. In reality, we are the ones whose imaginations created the heterosexual/homosexual scheme, and we are also the ones whose multitudes that scheme ultimately cannot contain. Eventually as a culture we will imagine our way into some different grand explanation, some other scheme for explaining our emotions and our desires and our passionate entanglements. For now, we believe in heterosexual. And this, too, shall pass. 199
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS My heartfelt thanks and deep admiration go to many, including but definitely not limited to S. Bear Bergman, Leigh Ann Craig, Anne Gwin, Lesley A. Hall, Patrick Harris, Arianna Iliff, Laura Waters Jackson, Lisa Buckley, Keridwen Luis, China Martens, Judith McLaughlin, Kelly Morris, Moira Russell, Danya Ruttenberg, Christopher Schelling, Jordan Stein, Mary Sykes, Elizabeth Tamny, and Rhetta Wiley. I also salute and thank those academics and researchers without whose work this book would have been completely impossible, including Stephanie Coontz, Peter Gay, Chrys Ingraham, Stevi Jackson, Angus McLaren, Steven Seidman, Edward Stein, Lawrence Stone, Jeffrey Weeks, Marilyn Yalom, and the late, much-missed Vern Bullough and Roy Porter. Especial intellectual thanks are due to the redoubtable Jonathan Ned Katz, to whose The Invention of Heterosexuality this book owes so much. Much that is good and right about this book is owed to these people, either directly or indirectly. Whatever faults or errors may remain are mine alone. Thanks are also due to the Creative Baltimore Fund, and to Edenfred and its sponsoring organization, the Terry Family Foundation, for a bit of world enough and time. Finally, there is not enough gratitude to convey my thanks to my beautiful and bold partner, Malcolm Gin, for everything, very much including being such a good sport about being made into a framing device for a history book.

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