transduction by infection with a virus does not require cell to cell contact

Transduction by infection with a virus does not

This preview shows page 20 - 23 out of 28 pages.

transduction (by infection with a virus: does not require cell to cell contact and is not sensitive to DNase) Transformation occurs in only some bacteria and requires the formation of a  receptor/channel complex (Com protiens in Bacillus), one strand is degraded and the other strand undergoes homologous recombination with the host chromosome Conjugation requires a fertility factor (genetic element that encodes genes required  for conjugation) that can be present on a plasmid in F+ cells or incorporated into the  cost chromosome in Hfr cells During conjugation the donor cell pulls recipient into close contact using cell surface appendages, called pili, a conjugation channel is formed connecting the two bacteria  and the donor DNA is cut at the OriT site, DNA replication proceeds by rolling  circle mechanism resulting in the transfer of one strand to the recipient cell where  the second strand is synthesized Chromosomal genes can be mapped by interrupted mating between Hfr cells and F  cells Excision of an F factor from the chromosome of an Hfr cell can in some cases result  in the transfer of host chromosomal DNA to the F plasmid, which can be transferred  to recipient cells (sexduction) 
Image of page 20
Transduction can be generalized (in which random bits of host DNA are  encapsulated into a page coat anomalously resulting in the inclusion of flanking  chromosomal DNA) Transposons Bacteria can harbor cut and paste IS elements or composite elements (in which two  closely spaced IS elements transpose together taking intervening sequences with  them) IS (insertion sequences) elements have terminal inverted repeats and an intervening  sequence that encodes the transposase gene, transposition involves the removal of  the IS element from its original site and insertion into a new site by creating a  staggered cut followed by insertion and gap filling, which creates a target site  duplication
Image of page 21
Bacteria can also harbor replicative transposons (Tn3) which transpose by a  mechanism that includes fusion of donor and recipient DNA elements followed by  transposon replication, homologous recombination and resolution that releases one  of the elements resulting in the duplication of the transposon Eukaryotes can harbor cut and paste transposons- Ac/Ds elements in corn and P  elements in fruit flies Transpositions of a Ds element requires the presence of an Ac element encoding the  transposase gene, which the Ds element lacks Eukaryotes can also harbor retroviruslike elements (Ty1 in yeast) that genetically  resemble retroviruses but lack the genes needed to spread outside of the cell, these 
Image of page 22
Image of page 23

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 28 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture