adapt modify change or incorporate any of these methodologies into their own

Adapt modify change or incorporate any of these

This preview shows page 3 - 6 out of 51 pages.

adapt, modify, change or incorporate any of these methodologies into their own processes 23 without needing a license to do so. We believe this is the best way to foster collaboration and 24 ensure that the evolving framework meets the needs of industry, regulators and air navigation 25 service providers, while enabling safe operations anywhere in the world. 26 All comments and critiques are welcome on this draft. Please submit them directly to 27 [email protected], referencing the relevant line numbers in the left-hand margin. 28 Many readers may be curious what relationship this framework has to the JARUS SORA 29 (Specific Operations Risk Assessment). The short answer is that we view this framework as 30 complementary to the SORA methodology. Altiscope’s risk framework also could be used to 31 extend SORA’s abilities – for example, by providing real-time risk assessment immediately 32
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DRAFT – FOR EXTERNAL CONSULTATION 2 before departure, or at any point in a flight. Because this is a quantitative framework, we expect 33 that it can be applied in high-volume, dynamic and autonomous settings in the future, for which 34 SORA alone would not be useable in its present form. 35 Acknowledgments 36 The development of this risk framework would not have been possible without the 37 contributions of Altiscope’s risk advisory group. Its members have volunteered countless hours 38 to discuss, debate and review the document and its supporting materials. The members of the risk 39 advisory group are: 40 Alliance for System Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (Marty Rogers) 41 Marc Baumgartner (International Federation of Air Traffic Controllers’ Associations) 42 Raytheon Company (Jackie Dent) 43 Mark Dombroff (LeClairRyan) 44 GreenSight Agronomics (Rob Knockenhauer and Ed Diaz-Gomez) 45 International Air Transport Association (Daniel Vaca) 46 National Air Traffic Controllers Association (Steve Weidner) 47 David Hyunchul Shim (KAIST) 48 Peng Wei (Iowa State University) 49 Readers are invited to submit comments on this draft to [email protected] 50 1. Introduction 51 Altiscope’s quantitative open risk framework recognizes that there are many steps between 52 today’s small UAS (sUAS) missions and the high-density autonomous flights envisioned 20 53 years from now. The current systems in place in manned aviation assume that all human 54 participants are properly trained and that all equipment meets rigorous certification standards. 55 But neither of those assumptions holds true for UAS operations today. Operators can receive a 56 remote pilot’s license in many countries without ever demonstrating competency in flying the 57 vehicle. And the vehicles themselves may vary widely in reliability and quality, since 58 manufacturers do not yet need to meet the same level of rigor in their design and assembly 59 processes as in conventional aircraft. 60
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DRAFT – FOR EXTERNAL CONSULTATION 3 The need for a consistent, repeatable and scalable approach to risk assessment in UAS 61 operations is immediate. In mid-2018, a consensus study report published by a committee of the
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  • Fall '15
  • Operational risk, Altiscope

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