Peer contagion the process through which children reinforce and promote

Peer contagion the process through which children

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Peer contagion: the process through which children reinforce and promote aggressive behavior in each other. Co-rumination: the process through which friends discuss feelings of depression, sadness, or hopelessness with each other, which heightens, rather than lessens feelings of depression. Types of support from friends
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DEP 3305, Hybrid Dr. Parker o Informational support: friends help and guidance in solving problems (school, friends, relationships.) o Instrumental support: help with tasks, like homework or chores. o Companionship support: providing company to social events. o Esteem support: encouragement and congratulations. Cliques: friendship groups you voluntarily form or join Crowds: groups of people who have similar stereotyped reputations among peers Sociometric status
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DEP 3305, Hybrid Dr. Parker Hostile attribution bias: The tendency to interpret others' behaviors as having hostile intent, even when the behavior is ambiguous or benign Peer Victimization: Repeated acts of aggression (intention to harm) against those who are unable to defend themselves or are of a lesser social standing. Excludes acts of teasing among equal peers Bullies: the perpetrators of bullying behavior . o Very socially adept and skilled. Advanced cognitive reasoning. o Not socially rejected. o Often have high self-esteem. o Socially dominant Victims: Those who are bullied o Tend to have few or no high quality friendships o Cautious, sensitive, quiet. o Physically smaller boys and quiet or shy girls are most at risk. o Depression and anxiety may put them at risk for being bullied o May have maladaptive coping strategies or emotion regulation o Not usually neglected children (socially) Bully-Victims: Bullied by larger more socially and physically adept peers but also bully others o Tend to be socially rejected o Ineffectual aggressors o Most likely to experience chronic victimization that exists across situations o Worst outcomes Bystanders: those who witness bullying incidents Week 10 False self: Façade put on for others to intentionally present an image of ourselves. Eric Erikson’s Psychosocial Theory of Development: Each stage of development is characterized by a crisis. The type and focus of the crisis is different at each stage.
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DEP 3305, Hybrid Dr. Parker Each crisis must be resolved in order to have healthy, normal development. If it is not resolved, they will be “stuck” in that crisis for the rest of their lives. Early experiences shape who we become later in life. Identity Vs. Role Confusion: Crisis of adolescence and young adulthood. Explore their identity and develop a stable coherent identity or else end up with role confusion. Ends with the development of a coherent identity or confusion and lack of understanding of what or who they should be .
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  • Winter '15
  • Theory of cognitive development, Antisocial personality disorder, Psychopathy, conduct disorder, Dr. Parker

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