S ss efficient central merchandising system

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S-S’s efficient central-merchandising system accommodated various suburban with different populations (purchasing is centralized compare to Eaton’s autonomy of purchasing by local store managers) S-S saw the need to accommodate customers with automobile and established policy to require inflexible ration of two yards parking space for every square yard of store area Eaton’s on the other hand were mainly located in downtown area had great difficulty in accommodating automobile traffic However, Eaton’s believed in customer loyalty and conducted survey to uncover shoppers were mainly high-income earners and decided to focus on these customers at the same time using well-established mail-order to serve the need of non-urban customers Accommodating Consumer Purchasing Power: Instalment Credit Instalment credit enabled the customer to purchase large goods and pay back at a later time which enhanced the purchasing power of consumer and soon became a very important form of purchasing power that drove the economy S-S had instituted revolving credit and followed Wood’s philosophy that previously unattainable goods should be widely available
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Eaton still maintained preference for cash payment Eaton’s credit arrangement was different includes monthly payments and deposit account and customers could not receive the product right a way Reaching out to the Consumer: The Catalogue Eaton was initially the innovator of catalogue but both S-S and Eaton’s enjoyed success in such method Initially the battle between catalogue was about pricing, which eaton includes pricing in pricing but S-S excludes it, Eaton maintained market share buy doing so Later the battle became about efficiency and distribution S-S sat up small catalogue-sales office in towns which widen the distribution and introduced automated catalogue system to allow customer to find out goods in stock information immediately and company were able to manage inventory more efficiently S-S got upper hand The Mid-1950s: The Department Store Scene Eaton’s still the dominating company while S-S follows and The HBC became strong competitor as well Addendum: It’s All about Wal-Mart in the End Eaton’s strategy to focus on mail-order business and urban market ultimately failed 1997 Eaton announce insolvency 1999 filed under bankruptcy protection 1970 Simpson’s were taken over by the HBC and S-S refused to top up the bid because it was too much S-S became the Sears Canada in 1984 1999 Sears Canada acquired Eaton’s Even after merger with K-Mart in US Sears was still not come close to Wal-Mart’s sized Week8: the Bank of Canada: Financial Institutions, law and policies in Canada 1955 James Elliot Coyne became the governor of the Bank of Canada
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The Coyne affair: Coyne reign the governor position State of the Canadian economy Emerging from post-war, post-depression era Role of the Bank of Canada Created in 1934 and opened in 1935 during the Great Depression As the Bank of Canada Act the role was: to regulate credit and currency in the best
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