Red howler Taxonomic classification Atelidae Alouattinae Alouatta seniculus

Red howler taxonomic classification atelidae

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Red howler Taxonomic classification: Atelidae; Alouattinae; Alouatta seniculus Diet: leaves, fruit Geographic location: South America Social organization: multi-male, multi-female, both sexes transfer Mating system: matings monopolized by the alpha male Social behavior: infanticide is common; social interactions rare; males cooperate in intergroup aggression; howls are used for intergroup spacing; there are roving male coalitions (sometimes kin), attemping to enter a new group; females are not usually permitted to join established groups -- they join up with other solitary males and females Researchers: C. Crockett, T. Pope, R. Sekulic, R. Rudran Optional reading: “Family Feuds” (C. Crockett)
spider monkeys Taxonomic classification: Atelidae; Atelinae; Ateles Diet: mainly fruit, some leaves & insects Geographic location: Central & South America Social organization: fission-fusion organization Mating system: not known; probably promiscuous Social behavior: very few data have been collected -- mainly on A. paniscus & A. geoffroyi; females have small core areas, and males range more widely; males are more social than females; some coalitions are observed (even male-male vs. female); females mainly travel with dependent offspring Unusual features/special topics: females have a grossly enlarged clitoris, which mimics male genitalia Researchers: C. Chapman, M. Farlington Symington; Klein; P. McDaniels, L. Fedigan; Baxter; J. Terborgh; van Roosmalen, Filippo Aureli, Colleen Schaffner, G. Ramos-Fernandez Optional reading: “Daughters or Sons” (S. Hrdy)
Muriquis Taxonomic classification: Atelidae; Atelinae; Brachyteles arachnoides Diet: leaves, fruit Geographic location: Brazil Social organization: multi-male, multi-female; male philopatry, female transfer Mating system: highly promiscuous; extensive sperm competition, no direct competition among males for mates Social behavior: rarely interact; no grooming, but some hugging; virtually no aggression; males more social than females; males are primary participants in intergroup aggression; females are easily integrated into new groups, mainly by playing with immatures Unusual features/special topics: no dominance hierarchies; unusually tolerant, peaceful primates Researchers: K. Strier, K. Milton Optional reading: “Menu for a Monkey” (K. Strier)
Common squirrel monkey Taxonomic classification: Cebidae; Cebinae; Saimiri sciureus Diet: fruit, insects Geographic location: South America Social organization: multi-male, multi-female, female philopatric, male transfer Mating system: promiscuous Social behavior: female-bonded (females have closer proximity and higher rates of affiliative behaviors than do males); males sometimes have "migration alliances" (migrate together -- it's not very clear what, exactly, these males do together) Unusual features/special topics: males engage in penile displays as an aggressive gesture Researchers: Carol Mitchell; J. Baldwin; J. Terborgh; W. Mason, S. Mendoza
Costa Rican squirrel monkey Taxonomic classification: Cebidae; Cebinae; Saimiri oerstedii Diet: fruit, insects Geographic location: Costa Rica

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